zip

(redirected from zipping)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

zip

1. noun Nothing; zero. A: "Did any payments come through today?" B: "Zip. I don't know how we're going to pay our rent." I knew I did horribly on that test, but I can't believe I actually scored zip.
2. noun Energy; vitality; vigor. The self-help book promises to put some zip back into your marriage. Come on, put a little zip in your step!
3. noun Speed. Wow, for such a tiny car, it's got a lot of zip!
4. verb To move with great speed. He zipped past me before I could ask him about our paychecks. I just need to zip to the bank and deposit this check.

Zip (up) your lip(s)!

slang Stop talking; shut up. A: "But Mom, I don't want to go!" B: "Zip your lip, Charlie! You're going to math camp, and that's final!" All right, everyone, zip up your lips! I don't want to hear another sound until the presentation is over.
See also: zip

Zip (up) your mouth(s)!

slang Stop talking; shut up. A: "But Mom, I don't want to go!" B: "Zip your mouth, Charlie! You're going to math camp, and that's final!" All right, everyone, zip up your mouths! I don't want to hear another sound until the presentation is over.
See also: zip

zip along

1. To move very speedily. I used to see him zipping along on his motorbike each morning. The runners zipped along on the race course.
2. To get moving; to leave promptly. You zip along and try those problems on your own—if you still have questions, we can go over them tomorrow during my office hours. I had better zip along before the bank closes.
See also: zip

zip by

1. To pass physically by (someone or something) with great speed. He zipped by before I could ask him about our paychecks. The police cars zipped by our house in pursuit of the criminals.
2. Of time, to pass very easily or pleasantly, as if going fast. Wow, the afternoon completely zipped by! Being stuck inside with the kids when it's raining can be a drag, but try coming up with inventive new games to play with them and the day will zip by.
3. To visit someone or some place for a brief period of time or for a particular purpose. Mary said she'd zip by for a quick visit. I just want to zip by the bank on the way home to deposit this check.
See also: by, zip

zip gun

informal An inexpensive homemade, makeshift, or improvised firearm. The extremist group had been assembling and stock-piling zip guns in preparation for the attack. Apparently, a zip gun the man had built himself went off in his backpack, causing everyone in the building to think that something had exploded.
See also: gun, zip

Zip it (up)!

Stop talking; shut up. A: "But Mom, I don't want to go!" B: "Zip it, Charlie! You're going to math camp, and that's final!" All right, everyone, zip it up! I don't want to hear another sound until the presentation is over.
See also: zip

zip on

To put on and close up a piece of clothing using a zipper. A noun or pronoun can be used between "zip" and "on." Make sure you zip your jacket on before you go—it's cold outside! I zipped on a fur coat and headed out into the snowstorm.
See also: on, zip

zip past

1. To move past (someone or something) very speedily. I used to see him zipping past on his motorbike each morning. The runner zipped past me on the trail. A bullet zipped past her head, missing her by a matter of millimeters.
2. Of some period or amount of time, to seem to pass very quickly. Is it time to go already? Wow, class really zipped past today. I remember when I was a kid and summer felt like an eternity. Now it just zooms past.
See also: past, zip

zip through

1. To move through something or some place with great quickness. He zipped through the office and out the door as soon as the clock struck five. She zipped through the streets in his bicycle to deliver the package.
2. To complete, accomplish, or work through something with great speed or ease. Don't just zip through the book like that, or you won't remember anything that happens a week later. Thanks to all my studying, I was able to zip through the test in less than an hour.
See also: through, zip

zip up

1. To fasten two pieces of fabric together using a zipper, especially on a piece of clothing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "zip" and "up." Make sure you zip up the entrance to the tent when you leave, or the mosquitoes will get in! I zipped up my fur coat and headed out into the snowstorm.
2. slang To stop talking; to shut up. Usually used as an imperative. In this usage, "it," "your mouth," or "your lip(s)" is always used before or after "up." A: "But Mom, I don't want to go!" B: "Zip your mouth up, Charlie! You're going to math camp, and that's final!" All right, everyone, zip up your lips! I don't want to hear another sound until the presentation is over.
See also: up, zip

Zip your lip(s) up!

slang Stop talking; shut up. A: "But Mom, I don't want to go!" B: "Zip your lip up, Charlie! You're going to math camp, and that's final!" All right, everyone, zip your lips up! I don't want to hear another sound until the presentation is over.
See also: zip

Zip your trap!

slang Stop talking; shut up. A: "But Mom, I don't want to go!" B: "Zip your trap, Charlie! You're going to math camp, and that's final!" All right, everyone, zip your traps! I don't want to hear another sound until the presentation is over.
See also: zip

zip along

to move along very fast. The motorcycle zipped along nicely. Let's zip along and get there on time.
See also: zip

zip past someone or something

to run or move past someone or something very rapidly. The deer zipped past the hunter, who stood there, startled. The cars zipped past the intersection.
See also: past, zip

zip something on

to put on a piece of clothing and zip it up. She zipped her jumper on and headed toward the door. Zip on your jacket and let's go.
See also: on, zip

zip something up

 
1. to close a zipper. You should zip that zipper up. You should zip up that zipper.
2. to close a garment by zipping a zipper closed. You had better zip your jacket up. You had better zip up your jacket.
3. Sl. to close one's mouth. (Fig. on {2}.) Zip your mouth up, Fred! Zip up your mouth, Fred.
See also: up, zip

Zip (up) your lip!

 and Zip it up!
Inf. Be quiet!; Close your mouth and be quiet! "I've heard enough. Zip your lip!" hollered the coach. Andy: All right, you guys. Shut up! Zip it up! Bob: Sorry. Andy: That's better.
See also: zip

zip by

v.
1. To pass quickly, as of a moving object or an interval of time: The summer zipped by so fast that we didn't get the chance to do half of the things we planned to.
2. To pass someone or something quickly: The cars zipped by the people on the side of the road.
3. To pay a brief visit: My friends zipped by for a quick lunch.
See also: by, zip

zip through

v.
1. To accomplish or proceed with something swiftly and energetically: She zipped through college in just three years.
2. To read something quickly and with ease: I zipped through five chapters of Great Expectations in less than an hour.
3. To move rapidly through something: The bird zipped through the air to its nest.
See also: through, zip

zip

1. n. nothing. There was no mail today. Nothing. Zip.
2. n. a score or grade of zero. Well, you got zip on the last test. Sorry about that.
3. n. vigor; spunk. Put some zip into it. It’s too ho-hum.
4. in. to move to a place fast. I’ll zip to the office and get a new form.
5. n. a worthless person; a person who amounts to zero. Garth is such a zip. No brains in his head at all.
6. n. an ounce of a drug. How much for a zip of hash.
7. n. cocaine. He’s freezing his nose with zip nearly every night.

zip along

in. to move along rapidly. Days are zipping along, and we’re all getting lots done.
See also: zip

zip gun

n. a homemade handgun. (Underworld.) The kid had a zip gun, so I didn’t argue.
See also: gun, zip

Zip (up) your lip!

and Zip it up!
exclam. Be quiet!; Zip up your mouth! Shhhh! Zip up your lip! Zip it up and keep it zipped.
See also: up, zip

Zip it up!

verb
See also: zip

Zip your lip!

verb
See also: zip

zipped

mod. drug intoxicated. (Drugs.) The kid is too zipped to talk.
See also: zip
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Zero-Exposure condition, zipping was 12 percent of normal speed.
The linear main effect for Previous Exposure was much stronger for Zipping (F(1,108) = 24.83, p < .001) than for Normal-speed recall, F(1,108) = 3.58, p < .07).
Consistent with previous research, the main effect for Speed (F(1,108) = 20.84, p < .001) showed that Zipping subjects recalled less than the Normal-speed subjects (see Table 2).
In the Zero-Exposure condition, Zipping was 29 percent of Normal.
In the Zipping condition, there was also a tendency for increased false positives among the other six brand names.
In the Zero-exposure condition zipping was 8 percent of normal.
The linear component was significant in the zipping condition, F(1, 108) = 11.81, p < .001.
The quadratic pattern for the Zipping condition had the opposite pattern.
In the Zipping condition, there was a decrease in the belief that the product had particular attributes.