you know


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you know

1. A filler phrase used when one is thinking of what to say next. I like the one with the, you know, the red thing on top.
2. A question posed at the end of a statement to elicit agreement or acknowledgment. I can't describe it. It just felt a little bittersweet, you know?
3. A phrase used to emphasize or draw attention to one's statement. I have skills. I'm not just some office drone, you know.
4. You know the answer; you know what or whom I'm referring to. A: "Which one's your cousin again?" B: "You know, she's the one you met at the concert." A: "What's that?" B: "You know, it's the coin we found in the river when we were kids."
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you know

an expression placed on the end of a statement for pause or emphasis. (This expression is often overused, in which case it is totally meaningless and irritating.) Tom: Sure, I spent a fortune on this car. Can't take it with you, you know. Rachel: But there are better things to do with it here and now. Bill: Do you always lock your door? Tom: Usually. There's a lot of theft around here, you know.
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you know

You are aware, you see, do you remember, as in She's very lonely, you know, so do go and visit, or You know, this exhibit ends tomorrow, or You know that black dog our neighbors had? She was run over a year ago. This phrase is also quite often a conversational filler, equivalent to "um" and occasionally repeated over and over (as in It's a fine day for, you know, the beach, and, you know, we could leave now); this usage is more oral than written, and many consider it deplorable. [Late 1500s]
See also: know

you ˈknow

(informal)
1 used when you are thinking of what to say next: He’s, you know, strange. It’s hard to explain.
2 used to show that what you are referring to is known or understood by the person you are speaking to: You know I bought a new bag? Well, someone stole it last night.
3 used to emphasize something that you are saying: I’m not stupid, you know.
See also: know

you know

Informal
Used parenthetically in conversation, as to fill pauses or educe the listener's agreement or sympathy: Please try to be, you know, a little quieter. How were we supposed to make camp in a storm like that, you know?
See also: know
References in periodicals archive ?
But, you know, I didn't mean to make her uncomfortable.
You know, there are all kinds of political correctness.
You know a concept, "indecisive." And you know a false implication, that indecisiveness is a self-contained phenomenon, that it is like an epileptic seizure--a powerful but limited mental event which suddenly knocks Clinton out at the end of the decision-making process.
You know what that means, but why are you saying that.
JR: And the other thing that bothered me was that - you know, black people come in to see the thing, and I didn't have much to show.
It was a great experience, to, you know, like, party.
"'Course it's not his boy, and you know that makes a difference."
"Did you know your cousins was dating each other and ain't even know it?" Granma asked me one day.
Fra Angelico was even called "primitive." In the MoMA exhibition Rubin, as you know, defended the term; he said he didn't know a better one.
I guess it's just if you know you can do something ...
He's building it mainly for you, you know. Nobody else in this family could care less if we had a horse."