you know


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you know

1. A filler phrase used when one is thinking of what to say next. I like the one with the, you know, the red thing on top.
2. A question posed at the end of a statement to elicit agreement or acknowledgment. I can't describe it. It just felt a little bittersweet, you know?
3. A phrase used to emphasize or draw attention to one's statement. I have skills. I'm not just some office drone, you know.
4. You know the answer; you know what or whom I'm referring to. A: "Which one's your cousin again?" B: "You know, she's the one you met at the concert." A: "What's that?" B: "You know, it's the coin we found in the river when we were kids."
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you know

an expression placed on the end of a statement for pause or emphasis. (This expression is often overused, in which case it is totally meaningless and irritating.) Tom: Sure, I spent a fortune on this car. Can't take it with you, you know. Rachel: But there are better things to do with it here and now. Bill: Do you always lock your door? Tom: Usually. There's a lot of theft around here, you know.
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you know

You are aware, you see, do you remember, as in She's very lonely, you know, so do go and visit, or You know, this exhibit ends tomorrow, or You know that black dog our neighbors had? She was run over a year ago. This phrase is also quite often a conversational filler, equivalent to "um" and occasionally repeated over and over (as in It's a fine day for, you know, the beach, and, you know, we could leave now); this usage is more oral than written, and many consider it deplorable. [Late 1500s]
See also: know

you ˈknow

(informal)
1 used when you are thinking of what to say next: He’s, you know, strange. It’s hard to explain.
2 used to show that what you are referring to is known or understood by the person you are speaking to: You know I bought a new bag? Well, someone stole it last night.
3 used to emphasize something that you are saying: I’m not stupid, you know.
See also: know

you know

Informal
Used parenthetically in conversation, as to fill pauses or educe the listener's agreement or sympathy: Please try to be, you know, a little quieter. How were we supposed to make camp in a storm like that, you know?
See also: know
References in periodicals archive ?
Before You Know It, which runs on personal computers and handheld devices, presents themed sets of vocabulary as a series of flash cards using a proprietary presentation scheme that makes learning faster and easier and makes sure users learn the material and remember it.
You know your Granpa built our house, ourshack, as you say, and you could see through the floorboards.
For instance, there are some lines that can be played rather broadly, but if you know my work, you know that all my characters maintain their dignity, and there should be no buffoonery on stage; so I look for directors who keep the actors reined in, and make a clear interpretation where all the actors maintain their dignity.
And, you know, basically when you're fired from any job, it's hard, but when you're publicly fired and humiliated it's really hard.
that indeed a lot of our predecessors were, as I'm sure you know, involved with drugs, the cigarette smoking, the atmospheres of the clubs.
I had a regular job with the city making no money to speak off but, you know, you take it out of your family and you find a way to make it work.
Like, two of them had flown, and the others had not, and my uncle Don was like, "Do you know, I looked down and I saw the Grand Canyon.
But over the years, he became, you know, more and more handsome.
They also then spoke about evil Marie Laveau; they also ran the obituary notice that Marie Laveau was, you know, dead, and there were charms.
It is ridiculous to buy something you know is not good for you, then sue and try to blame the tobacco companies.
And I proceeded to write the same kind of junk I had been reading, you know, just copycat stuff, stuff that used to belong only on 42nd Street, but it's now all over.
And there's a part in the scene where I, you know, whip it out, and Louis says, "Do you have a condom?
He was an all right colored man, bailed out the coloreds when they got arrested; and coloreds were always getting arrested, you know, because every week bad a Saturday in it and every Saturday night some fool was going upside some other fool's head and the white folks was calling my daddy.