you can't go home again


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you can't go home again

You can't truly go back to a place you once lived because so much will have changed since you left that it is not the same place anymore. Jim is so excited to visit his childhood town—I hope he knows that you can't go home again. I had such a great time in college that I'm nervous to go back for my reunion, since you can never go home again.
See also: again, home
References in periodicals archive ?
In chapter 29 ("'The Hollow Men'") of You Can't Go Home Again, Wolfe graphically places on exhibition the suicide of a common man, ultimately relying on the symbol of blood as a call to action to raise awareness about the decline of society.
When teaching You Can't Go Home Again, I focus more on historical contexts.
Four weeks prior to the publication of You Can't Go Home Again, poet Ernest Thayer died, leaving no joy in Mudville.
In this section of You Can't Go Home Again, the narrator is describing George Webber's realization that "he had brought upon himself" much of the trouble he had experienced in his life and that many of his problems "had come from leaping down the throat of things.
He chose The Party at Jack's, which German readers knew only by the shortened and falsified version from You Can't Go Home Again.
A 2013 blog entry by Nicholas Graham ("Edward Gorey and Thomas Wolfe") for North Carolina Miscellany celebrates Gorey on his birthday (22 February) and explains that fans of Gorey will recognize his work on the covers of Anchor editions of The Web and the Rock (1953) and You Can't Go Home Again (1957) and features the two covers.
It was as though Joe were trying to write War and Peace without Pierre, The Great Gatsby without Nick Carraway, Great Expectations without Pip, You Can't Go Home Again without Eugene Gant.
Again from California, on 1 December 1940, he wrote British scholar Esmond Wright, "On the matter of the class-ridden society, if you have the opportunity, I wish you would read a chapter in Thomas Wolfe's new novel You Can't Go Home Again, called 'The Universe of Daisy Purvis.
They say you can't go home again, but in a way Sheldon Epps already has.
First broadcast on TV during the week preceding the 1972 Munich Olympics, the program is based on Wolfe's 1936 visit to Berlin and to the Olympic games--or dramatized scenes of his version of events in You Can't Go Home Again as George Webber (portrayed by American actor Burt Nelson).
Thomas Wolfe, the adjectival Tar Heel, not the dandified Virginia expositor of The Right Stuff, philosophized in his execrably titled You Can't Go Home Again that "A man learns a great deal about life from writing and publishing a book.
You can't go home again, but you can eat a Varsity chili dog in the Fox Theatre on the radio" (140).
Later appearing as the concluding chapters of book 6 in You Can't Go Home Again (1940) this piece features George Webber's realization that he and his fellow train travelers are "saying farewell, not to a man, but to humanity; not to some pathetic stranger, some chance acquaintance of the voyage, but to mankind; not to some nameless cipher out of life, but to the fading image of a brother's face" (699).
Bill Cosby told University of Connecticut graduates you can't go home again, at least not without angering the little brother or sister who got your old room.
He was nineteen years old, on an army base during World War II, when he first heard of Wolfe, and he immediately went to the post library and checked out You Can't Go Home Again.
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