yield to (someone or something)

(redirected from yield something to)

yield to (someone or something)

1. To allow someone or something to move in front of or before oneself; to give someone or something the right of way. This sign means you have to yield to oncoming traffic. I could have gone first, but I decided to yield to them because they were carrying such a heavy load.
2. To submit or give in to someone or something; to relinquish victory to someone or something. He yielded to his opponent after being put in a chokehold. We will never yield to enemy forces—we will fight until there isn't a single one of us left standing!
3. To allow oneself to be convinced, persuaded, overcome, etc., by some person or force. I managed to stay off cigarettes for about a week before finally yielding to temptation. I hadn't meant for things to go so far on our first date, but I couldn't help but yield to his charming words and smoldering eyes.
4. To allow someone or something to have or take something; to sacrifice, concede, or relinquish something to someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "yield" and "to." Remember to yield right-of-way to the other driver if you're stopped at a stop sign. I was forced to yield the land to the banks because of the mortgage my father had taken out on it during the recession.
See also: yield

yield something to someone

 
1. . to give the right-of-way to someone. You must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians. You failed to yield the right-of-way to the oncoming car. 2. to give up something to someone. The army yielded the territory to the invading army. We yielded the territory to the government.
See also: yield

yield to someone

 
1. to let someone go ahead; to give someone the right-of-way. Please yield to the next speaker. She yielded to the next speaker.
2. to give in to someone. She found it hard to yield to her husband in an argument. I will yield to no one.
See also: yield

yield to

v.
1. To give oneself up to someone, as in defeat: The platoon chose to fight to the end and would not yield to the enemy.
2. To give way to some pressure or force: The door yielded to a gentle push.
3. To give way to some argument, persuasion, influence, or entreaty: I'm dieting, but I sometimes yield to temptation and eat a cookie.
4. To give up one's place, as to one that is superior: The moderator opened the conference and then yielded to the chairperson.
See also: yield