yank

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yank (one's) chain

To tease someone, often by trying to convince him or her of something that isn't true. Quit yanking my chain, I know there isn't a Hollywood director calling me right now. I love yanking my sister's chain—it's almost too easy to annoy her.
See also: chain, yank

yank at someone or something

to pull or tug at someone or something. Please don't yank at the drapery cord. Stop yanking at me!
See also: yank

yank on something

to pull or tug on something. Don't yank on my hair! Yank on this rope to send a signal to the worker on the floor above.
See also: on, yank

yank someone around

Sl. to harass someone; to give someone a hard time. Listen, I don't mean to yank you around all the time, but we have to have the drawings by Monday. Please stop yanking me around.
See also: around, yank

yank someone or something apart

 
1. to pull, tear, or rip someone or something to pieces. Please don't yank the book apart! He yanked apart the book! He threatened to yank his opponent apart.
2. to separate people or things. The teacher yanked them apart. The teacher yanked apart the fighting boys.
See also: apart, yank

yank someone or something around

to pull or jerk someone or something around. Don't yank Billy around so. You'll hurt him! Please don't yank the chairs around. Move them carefully.
See also: around, yank

yank someone or something away (from someone or something)

to jerk someone or something away from someone or something. He yanked his hand away from the fire. Please yank away that rug from the fire before it gets burned.
See also: away, yank

yank someone or something into something

 and yank someone or something
to jerk or pull someone or something into something. Mary yanked Sally into the car and sped off. She yanked in the anchor rope and we rowed away.
See also: yank

yank someone or something off (of) something

 and yank someone or something off
to jerk someone or something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) She yanked the coffeepot off the counter and ran upstairs. She yanked off the box lid.
See also: off, yank

yank someone or something out of something

 and yank someone or something out
to pull or jerk someone or something out of something. Sam yanked the turnips out of the ground one by one. He yanked out the best of the young carrots from the rich soil.
See also: of, out, yank

yank someone's chain

Sl. to harass someone; to give someone a hard time. (As if one were a dog wearing a choker collar, on a leash.) Stop yanking my chain! Do you really think you can just yank my chain whenever you want?
See also: chain, yank

yank something off

to pull or jerk off something, such as a piece of clothing. She yanked her jacket off. She yanked off her jacket and threw it on the chair.
See also: off, yank

yank something up

to pull or jerk something up. He yanked his pants up. He yanked up his pants and threw on his shirt.
See also: up, yank

pull someone's chain

1. Make someone speak out of turn, as in Who pulled your chain?-It's none of your business. [1920s]
2. Make someone angry, especially deliberately, as in Teenagers really know how to pull their parents' chains. [c. 1960] Both usages allude to the literal sense of chain-pulling, that is, "causing someone to do something, as though activated by a chain."
See also: chain, pull

pull someone's chain

or

yank someone's chain

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you pull someone's chain or yank their chain, you tease them about something, for example by telling them something which is not true. I glared at her, and she smiled. When would I learn to smarten up and ignore her when she pulled my chain? Note: The image here is of someone teasing a dog by pulling the chain that it is tied up with.
See also: chain, pull

pull (or yank) someone's chain

tease someone, especially by leading them to believe something that isn't true. US informal
See also: chain, pull

yank somebody’s ˈchain

(American English, informal) tell somebody something which is not true, as a joke: Did you mean what you said, or were you just yanking my chain?
Yank means pull something hard, quickly and suddenly.
See also: chain, yank

beat the dummy

and beat the meat and beat one’s meat and beat the pup and choke the chicken and pound one’s meat and pull one’s pud and pull one’s wire and whip one’s wire and whip the dummy and yank one’s strap
tv. to masturbate. (Usually objectionable.) Are you going to sit around all day pulling your pud? We heard him in there “choking the chicken,” as the street crowd says.
See also: beat, dummy

yank one’s strap

verb
See also: strap, yank

yank

1. tv. to harass someone. (see also yank someone around.) Stop yanking me!
2. n. a Yankee; a U.S. soldier. (Usually Yank.) I don’t care if you call me a yank. That’s what I am.
3. in. to vomit. Somebody or some animal yanked on the driveway.

yank someone around

tv. to harass someone; to give someone a hard time. (see also jerk someone around.) Please stop yanking me around.
See also: around, yank

yank someone’s chain

and pull someone’s chain
tv. to harass someone; to give someone a hard time. (As if one were a dog wearing a choker collar, on a leash.) Stop yanking my chain, you twit! Do you really think you can just pull my chain whenever you want?
See also: chain, yank

yank someone’s crank

tv. to tease a male sexually. Don’t pay any attention to her. She’s just yanking your crank.
See also: crank, yank

yanked

mod. arrested. (Underworld.) Lefty got himself yanked one too many times.
See also: yank