yank away

yank someone or something away (from someone or something)

to jerk someone or something away from someone or something. He yanked his hand away from the fire. Please yank away that rug from the fire before it gets burned.
See also: away, yank
References in periodicals archive ?
The Trump plan is to raise tolls on commuters, increase the burdenon cities and states, sell our essential infrastructure to the whims of Wall Street, and yank away the protections that keep consumers safe and our air and water clean," Pelosi said in a Twitter message on Monday, RIA Novosti reported.
The Trump plan is to raise tolls on commuters, increase the burden on cities and states, sell our essential infrastructure to the whims of Wall Street, and yank away the protections that keep consumers safe and our air and water clean.
Years later, as Facebook emerged as the main channel through which readers access news (particularly on smartphones) newsrooms scrambled to fill its pipe in every possible way, all the while worrying about losing control of their audiences, and nervous that Facebook would yank away their traffic with a tweak of the algorithm.
To me, as to a number of economists perhaps most notably Lawrence Summers, the former Treasury secretary the answer seems painfully obvious: Don't yank away that punch bowl, don't pull that rate-hike trigger, until you see the whites of inflation's eyes.
regional interests (Israel was probably due for a military upgrade for Iran-related reasons anyway), getting the freeze extended was probably the best possible option, even if on its face it seems like (to mix football metaphors) Charlie Brown lining up one more time to kick the ball that Lucy will inevitably yank away.
You can hear the think-tank policy architects and the legislators cracking their knuckles just before they yank away the remaining safety net.
A) sticky foods that yank away pieces of the tooth's enamel.
If the guy has his tongue in your mouth (and you're OK with that), you don't want to just yank away from him.
A sharp burst of laser light striking an atom can yank away an electron, ionizing the atom.