yada, yada, yada

yada, yada(, yada)

1. slang Used to summarize, characterize, or represent information or chatter that one finds boring, trivial, or unnecessary. The phrase was popularized by the television show Seinfeld in the 1990s. Sometimes spelled "yadda, yadda, yadda." So then I ran into my friend, Sarah. Sarah and I went to high school together, and we were really good friends until we had a bit of a falling out. Yada, yada, yada, the point is that I haven't seen her in a long time. A: "You've got to be absolutely sure you have this latch—" B: "Secured, or else it could come loose on the road, and that would be bad, yadda, yadda, I know." A: "Did you make sure read the End User's License Agreement?" B: "Who ever reads those things? It's always just the same yada, yada."
2. slang By extension, et cetera; so on and so forth. A: "What are you up to tonight?" B: "Not much. Dinner, homework, yada, yada. How about you?" There were all sorts of things stuck in that attic—old furniture, dolls' houses, broken appliances, yada, yada, yada.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

yada, yada, yada

and Y3
phr. & comp. abb. talk, talk, talk. (see also yatata-yatata.) Y3. What utter B.S.
See also: yada
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Parents will also be well-versed with the insistence from schools that they "take bullying very seriously", yada, yada, yada.
-culture, migration, technology, politics, religion, climate, heartache, economics, yada, yada, yada.
No matter what the question, he had the very same answer--our promise, our commitment to Canadians to invest in the economy, the right thing to do, yada, yada, yada, transparency, yada, yada, yada.
I have great excuses: Major projects for clients of my marketing consulting firm, new business pitches, wrapping up my term as president of AAF-Cleveland, my daughter's wedding - yada, yada, yada.
Yada, yada, yada. Didn't make the slightest bit of difference that whatever it was they were screaming about was probably right (I didn't figure that out until well into my adult years, but there you go).
As always seven strangers, most of whom this season lack much depth, were picked to live in a house, yada, yada, yada. But by mid-season we've fast-forwarded through the expulsion of one cast member, the death of another cast member's mother and now we've seen what's been teased for weeks: the arrival of the exes.
He's got money, his opponents don't, the establishment is with him, he has won five statewide elections, yada, yada, yada. His chief opponent at the moment, Tom Pauken, has never held elected office and doesn't have Abbott's resources.
He also winks at the reader/Must See fan through witty and fun chapter titles that are a salute to the top shows: "Yada, Yada, Yada" (Seinfeld), "Master of My Domain" (Seinfeld), "I'll Be There for You" (Friends) and "Batting for the Other Team" ( Will & Grace).
Taub ("SCI & Pain Management," June), but yada, yada, yada....
You already know the story: DK makes off with Mario's woman, Mario chases him, they fight, yada, yada, yada.
Yada, yada, yada. Sounds like the prelude to Superman, with a splash of Seinfeld jargon, hunh?
First thing, Martin brings in a Chronicle snippet announcing another small, single-sex-affiliated, tuition-dependent (yada, yada, yada) institution has bitten the dust.
Yada, yada, yada. Nary a word in 336 long, anguished pages hinting that having children is a joy, that spending time with them, in addition to being a lot of work, might actually be fun.