wrought


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what hath God wrought

"What has God done"; usually used to express one's awe. The phrase originated in the Bible and, in 1844, Samuel Morse sent it as the first telegram. Every time I look at my infant daughter, all I can do is marvel—what hath God wrought.
See also: god, hath, what, wrought

wreak havoc

To cause a lot of problems. Termites have wreaked havoc on the structural integrity of our house, unfortunately.
See also: havoc, wreak

wreak havoc (with something)

to cause a lot of trouble with something; to ruin or damage something. Your bad attitude will wreak havoc with my project. The rainy weather wreaked havoc with our picnic plans.
See also: havoc, wreak

*wrought up

disturbed or excited. (Wrought is an old past tense and past participle meaning "worker." *Typically: be ~; get ~.) She is so wrought up, she can't think. I am sorry you are so wrought up.
See also: up, wrought

wreak havoc

Create confusion and inflict destruction. Havoc, which comes from the medieval word for “plunder,” was once a specific command for invading troops to begin looting and killing in a conquered village. This is what Shakespeare meant by his oft-quoted “Cry ‘havoc’ and let slip the dogs of war” (Julius Caesar, 3.1). Although the word still means devastating damage, to wreak it has been transferred to less warlike activities, as in “That puppy will wreak havoc in the living room.” Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in the The Birds of Killingworth (1863) stated, “The crow . . . crushing the beetle in his coat of mail, and crying havoc on the slug and snail.”
See also: havoc, wreak