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that's all she wrote

This is the end; there is nothing left to say. That's all she wrote for the defending champions, who fall just short of bringing home the title a second time. I'm sorry, Ben, but the board's decision is final. That's all she wrote, I'm afraid.
See also: all, she, wrote

that's what she wrote

This is the end; there is nothing left to say. An uncommon variant of "that's all she wrote." That's what she wrote for the defending champions, who fall just short of bringing home the title a second time.
See also: she, what, wrote

write (one's) (own) ticket

To have the means, ability, or empowerment to decide one's own terms or course of action. Students who specialize in computer programming have been able to write their tickets in the economy for the last several years, as demand has continued to outpace supply for skilled employees in this field. The movie star began writing her own tickets after she exploded in popularity in the early 2000s.
See also: ticket, write

write (someone or something) down as (something)

To create a piece of writing about someone or something that classifies, categorizes, or signifies them as a particular kind of person or thing. I'll write you down as a "maybe" for right now. Just give me a more definitive yes or no when we get closer to the date of the party. The seller wrote this item down as brand new, but it has clearly been used before. The author wrote this story down as a warning to future generations.
See also: down, write

write a bum check

To submit a money order as payment when the account being drawn upon does not or will not have adequate funds for the order to clear. Primarily heard in US. My ex-husband was so addicted to shopping that, by the end of our marriage, he had started writing bum checks just to keep making purchases. Being in debt has always scared the hell out of me, so I've made sure to never write a bum check in my life.
See also: bum, check, write

write about (someone or something)

1. To create a piece of writing that tells a narrative or provides detailed information about someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "about" to specify the kind of writing that is being created. I'm currently writing about the First Indochina War for my new book. He's writing a novel about a butler who falls in love with his mistress.
2. To write a piece of correspondence, such as a letter or email, that discusses or inquires about someone or something. Usually used as an introduction in one's own writing. To whom it may concern, I am writing today about an offer you had advertised in your store. Hello Mrs. Jenkins, I am the Vice-Principal at Sand Dune High School. I'm writing about your daughter, Samantha, who has been absent from school for the last three days.
3. To send a piece of written correspondence, such as a letter or email, to someone in order to discuss or inquire about someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "write" and "about." I'll write my friend in New York about the company that's offering the job. She'll be able to tell me if they're legit. He's writing the company's head office about the abusive employee he dealt with over the phone.
See also: write

write against (someone or something)

To create a piece of writing that opposes someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "against" to specify the kind of writing that is being created. She's made a career out of writing against corrupt politicians. The CEO wrote a scathing op-ed about the proposed legislation in the New York newspaper.
See also: write

write away

1. To send a typed or handwritten request by mail. Typically followed by "for something" or "to someone or something." We'll have to write away for the component we need, as there's only one manufacturer in the region and he doesn't have a phone or email address. Once I had enough barcodes from the back of the cereal box, I had to write away to the company in order to claim my prize.
2. To write a large amount very quickly or continuously. I want to get my thesis done soon, so I've been writing away for the last three weeks. I just want to put my headphones on and write away by myself—I can't abide all these distractions!
See also: away, write

write back

To respond (to some person, group, or organization) in writing, especially in a letter or email. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "back." I'm sorry it's taken me so long to write back, but work has been incredibly busy lately. I've been meaning to write them back all week. It just keeps slipping my mind.
See also: back, write

write back to (someone or something)

To respond to some person, group, or organization in writing, especially in a letter or email. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "back" to specify the kind of correspondence that is being written. I'm sorry it's taken me so long to write back to you, but work has been incredibly busy lately. I've been meaning to write an email back to them all week. It just keeps slipping my mind.
See also: back, to, write

write down

1. To record or note something on paper. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "down." I managed to write down the license plate number of the car before it sped away from the accident. Make sure you write the directions down so you don't forget!
2. To list the value or price of something as being lower than it was before, especially for tax purposes. We have a number of financial assets we'll be able to write down at the end of the years.
See also: down, write

write down to (one)

To write in a manner that is insultingly condescending to the reader; to write as if the reader or readers are less mature, intelligent, or capable than they really are. I love this children's author. She tells beautiful stories that resonate with kids, while never seeming to write down to them. I hate the way the boss writes down to the employees in his memos.
See also: down, to, write

write for (someone or something)

1. To produce written work for a publication or type thereof. I used to write for The New York Times before branching off as a novelist. She got a great gig writing for several different travel blogs.
2. To produce written work that is aimed at a particular readership or demographic. Just because you write for kids doesn't mean you can't write about complex topics. He primarily writes for hardcore science fiction fans, so it can be a little alienating if you're not into that sort of thing.
3. To send a piece of written correspondence to someone in order to request something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "write" and "for." She wrote the governor himself for special permission to hold the event in the city. I'll write the consulate for an escort to meet us at the airport.
See also: for, write

write in

1. verb To vote for a candidate not listed on the ballot by writing their name in a space provided. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "in." So many people wrote in Mrs. Daley for the position that she was nearly elected. He didn't win the primary, but a lot of people are saying they're going to write him in during the general election.
2. verb To add something to a document by writing it. It's OK if you've already printed it out—you can just write in the missing footnote at the bottom of the page.
3. verb To add something to a work of fiction, such as a story or script, often in order to satisfy some requirement. The studio wants us to write in a few more action scenes. Have you seen the new season? They wrote in a new sister character.
4. verb To send a message to an organization by mail or email. That's it for this week's show. Don't forget to write in and tell us about your favorite memories for our anniversary special. I wrote in to ask for a refund, and I actually got one.
5. noun A candidate not listed on the ballot who receives votes from voters who write the candidate's name in a space provided. He's not affiliated with any party, but he says he's trying to win as a write-in.
6. noun A vote for such a candidate. As a noun, the phrase is hyphenated. There were a lot of write-ins. Someone voted for Daffy Duck.
See also: write

write into (something or some place)

1. To send a message to some group or organization by mail, email, or text message. Every week we get tons of people writing into the station asking us to play all sorts of crazy music. Someone wrote into the office the other day with a complaint about one of our employees. That's it for this week's show. Don't forget to write into us and tell us about your favorite memories for our anniversary special.
2. To write or type some piece of information inside of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "write" and "into." He wrote the information into his notebook. She wrote her number into my phone and told me to call her sometime soon. I kept my laptop open during the lecture so I could write things into my notes if I needed.
3. To insert or include something inside of a document or contract. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is usually used between "write" and "into." It turns out that they had written into the contract a clause giving the CEO total control over the company in certain situations. She made sure to write those specific terms into her contract before she would agree to sign.
See also: write

write of (someone or something)

To discuss someone or something in one's writing. In her latest novel, Ms. Evans writes of the despair that can follow us when we lose someone in whom we have invested our very self-worth. I was pleased to no end when you wrote of making several new friends at the university.
See also: of, write

write off

1. In accounting, to consider something a loss. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "off." We've been keeping these outstanding payments on the books, but we need to write them off as a loss.
2. In accounting, to record an asset as having no value. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "off." That equipment can no longer be used, so we are writing it off.
3. To dismiss as insufficient, worthless, or a failure. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "off." Don't write off Joe so fast. He's smarter than you think. I could tell that they wrote me off as soon as I walked on the court, but that just motivated me to play harder.
4. To disregard something due to perceiving it as unimportant or not warranting special attention. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "off." At the time, I wrote off his behavior as just a product of stress from work. Obviously now I can see it was more than that. Most people wrote the comment off as a simple gaffe, but I think it had a deeper significance.
5. To send a written message, often a request. When I was a kid, I used to write off to my favorite athletes asking them for autographs. Mom is not happy with the bill, so she's writing off a letter to the company.
6. noun In accounting, the act of considering something a loss, or the item itself. As a noun, the phrase is hyphenated. All of these write-offs will significantly change our valuation.
7. noun In accounting, the act of recording an asset as having no value, or the asset itself. As a noun, the phrase is hyphenated. The car was totaled, so it ended up being a write-off.
See also: off, write

write on (someone or something)

1. Literally, to write words on some surface or material, as with ink or some other substance. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "on." I told the tattoo artist to write "I Luv Trucks" on my chest. Tommy, please don't write on the walls!
2. To place a piece of flimsy material, such as paper, on top of some hard, flat surface in order to write upon it. With nothing else around, I had to sit down and write on the ground while I filled out the application. A: "Shoot, I forgot to bring a clipboard!" B: "Here, you can write on this textbook."
3. To create a narrative about or a detailed description of someone or something in a piece of writing. She frequently writes on the imminent dangers of climate change. My editor asked me to write on a local politician for my next article.
See also: on, write

write on and on

To write a large amount, especially continually or to an excessive degree. I can't wait to get this thesis finished. I feel like I've just been writing on and on for the past three months. She wrote on and on in her complaint to the airlines. The academic writes on and on about the flaws of capitalism without offering a single meaningful suggestion of how to improve things.
See also: and, on, write

write on water

To have a fleeting impact, as opposed to a lasting legacy. People will forget these superficial pop stars in no time—their careers are written on water.
See also: on, water, write

write out

1. To write down all of the letters or words of something that could be expressed in an abbreviated form or as a symbol. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "out." Please write out your full address, not just your house number and street name. Many on the board can't read shorthand, so please write everything out in standard English.
2. To express in writing something one is thinking, especially to help clarify or articulate it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "out." OK, why don't we sit down and write out all the reasons why this would be a good or bad idea. He was having trouble saying what he meant, so I suggest that he try writing it out.
3. To write so much or so constantly as to exhaust one's energy, capabilities, or ideas. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is used between "write" and "out," except in passive constructions. Be sure to give yourself regular short breaks or you'll end up writing yourself out before the end of the day. By the time I reached the end of the four-hour exam, I was well and truly written out.
See also: out, write

write to (someone or something)

1. To send some written correspondence, such as a letter or email, to someone or some organization. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "to" to specify the kind of written correspondence. She wrote a strongly worded letter to the airline to complain about the long delays on her flight. I'll have to write to your parents to let them know what happened.
2. To write something that acts as a part of or supplement to a different or larger piece of writing. A noun or pronoun is used between "write" and "to." My editor asked me to write an appendix to my latest book to help explain some of the more complicated historical details. She is currently writing a companion piece to her bestselling novel.
3. To send someone a written correspondence in order to communicate something specific. A noun or pronoun can be used between "write" and "to." I'm writing you to explain my absence from the meeting yesterday. The bank wrote to tell me that my account had had some suspicious activity recently.
See also: to, write

wrote the book on (something)

To be well-known for being extremely experienced in or knowledgeable about something; to be renowned as an expert in something; to know nearly everything about something. The phrase has become so clichéd that it is often used after the word "literally" to describe someone who has actually written a book about a certain topic. This lady wrote the book on modern sound design, so I can't wait to work with her in the recording studio. He literally wrote the book on such trade wars, which was published shortly after his second term as president.
See also: book, on, wrote
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

That's all she wrote.

 and That's what she wrote.
Inf. That is all of it.; That is the last of it. Here's the last one we have to fix. There, that's all she wrote. That's what she wrote. There ain't no more.
See also: all, she, wrote

write away

to write a lot; to continue writing. There he was, writing away, not paying attention to anything else. I spent the entire afternoon writing away, having a fine, productive time.
See also: away, write

write in (to something) (for something)

to send a written request to something for something in particular. Please write in for a detailed recipe of all the dishes on today's program. I am going to write in for a clarification.
See also: write

write off (to someone) (for something)

to send a written request for something away to someone. I wrote off to my parents for some money, but I think they are ignoring me. I wrote off for money. I need money so I wrote off to my parents.
See also: off, write

write on and on

to write too much; to write endlessly. You tend to write on and on. Try to focus on one point and leave it at that. I think you write on and on just to fill up space.
See also: and, on, write

write someone in (on something)

to write the name of someone in a special place on a ballot, indicating a vote for the person. (Done when the person's name is not already printed on the ballot.) Please write my name in on the ballot. I wrote in your name on the ballot.
See also: write

write someone or something off

to drop someone or something from consideration. The manager wrote Tom off for a promotion. I wrote off that piece of swampy land as worthless. It can't be used for anything.
See also: off, write

write someone or something off

 (as a something)
1. . to give up on turning someone or something into something. I had to write Jill off as a future executive. The company wrote off the electric automobile as a dependable means of transportation. He would never work out. We wrote him off.
2. . to give up on someone or something as a dead loss, waste of time, hopeless case, etc. Don't write me off as a has-been. We almost wrote off the investment as a dead loss.
3. . to take a charge against one's taxes. Can I write this off as a deduction, or is it a dead loss? Can I write off this expense as a tax deduction?
See also: off, write

write something down

to make a note of something; to record something in writing. Please write this down. Please write down what I tell you.
See also: down, write

write something off

to absorb a debt or a loss in accounting. The bill couldn't be collected, so we had to write it off. The bill was too large, and we couldn't write off the amount. We decided to sue.
See also: off, write

write something off (on one's taxes)

to deduct something from one's income taxes. Can I write this off on my income taxes? I'll write off this trip on my taxes. Oh, yes! Write it off!
See also: off, write

write something out

 
1. to spell or write a number or an abbreviation. Don't just write "7," write it out. Please write out all abbreviations, such as Doctor for Dr.
2. . to put thoughts into writing, rather than keeping them in memory. Let me write it out. Then I won't forget it. Karen wrote out her objections.
See also: out, write

wrote the book on something

Fig. to be very authoritative about something; to know enough about something to write the definitive book on it. (Always in past tense.) Ted wrote the book on unemployment. He's been looking for work in three states for two years. Do I know about misery? I wrote the book on misery!
See also: book, on, wrote
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

write down

1. Set down in writing, record, as in Please write down your new address and phone number. [Late 1500s]
2. Reduce in rank, value, or price, as in They've written down their assets. [Late 1800s]
3. Write in a simple or condescending style, as in These science texts are written down for high-school students. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: down, write

write in

1. Cast a vote by inserting a name not listed on the ballot, as in He asked them to write in his name as a candidate. [c. 1930]
2. Insert in a text or document, as in Please don't write in your corrections on the printed pages, but list them separately. [Late 1300s]
3. Communicate with an organization by mail, as in Listeners are being asked to write in their requests. [1920s]
See also: write

write off

1. Reduce an asset's book value to zero because it is worthless, as in The truck was wrecked completely, so we can write it off. [Late 1600s]
2. Cancel from an account as a loss, as in Since they'll never be able to pay back what they owe, let's just write off that debt. [Late 1800s] Also see charge off, def. 2.
3. Regard as a failure or worthless, as in There was nothing to do but write off the first day of our trip because of the bad weather , or She resented their tendency to write her off as a mere housewife. [Late 1800s]
4. Amortize, as in We can write off the new computer network in two years or less. Also see charge off, def. 2.
See also: off, write

write out

1. Express in writing, especially in full form. For example, Write out your request on this form, or No abbreviations allowed; you have to write everything out. [Mid-1500s]
2. write oneself out. Exhaust one's energies or abilities by writing too much, as in He's been doing a novel a year for ages, but now he's written himself out. [Early 1800s]
See also: out, write

wrote the book on

Knows nearly everything about, as in Ask Dr. Lock; he wrote the book on pediatric cardiology, or I wrote the book on job-hunting; I've been looking for two years. This expression is always put in the past tense. [Colloquial; second half of 1900s]
See also: book, on, wrote
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

that's all she wrote

AMERICAN
You say that's all she wrote when there is no more to say or when something is finished. That was all she wrote. He got hurt, and he didn't play much anymore.
See also: all, she, wrote
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

(and) that's all she wrote

used to convey that there is or was nothing more to be said about a matter. North American informal
2001 Chicago Tribune The snap was a little high, and…I tilted up for a second and that's all she wrote…I took my eye off the ball.
See also: all, she, wrote

wrote the book on

know everything there is to know about; be the expert on. informal, chiefly North American
See also: book, on, wrote
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

that’s all she ˈwrote

(American English, informal) used when you are stating that there is nothing more that can be said about something or that something is completely finished: And that’s all she wrote for today, folks, because it’s time for me to go.All you have to do is point and shoot and that’s all she wrote.
See also: all, she, wrote
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

write away

v.
To send a written request: I wrote away for a replacement part when my vacuum cleaner broke down.
See also: away, write

write down

v.
1. To set something down in writing: I wrote down all my thoughts in a journal. If you remember the address, write it down before you forget it again!
2. To reduce something in rank, value, or price: The store is writing down all obsolete inventory. When the tickets didn't sell, we wrote them down to half price.
3. To disparage something in writing. Used chiefly in the passive: The movie was written down in all the newspapers.
4. To write in a conspicuously simple or condescending style: The author wrote down to the unsophisticated audience.
See also: down, write

write in

v.
1. To cast a vote by inserting some name not listed on a ballot: The members of the minority party wrote in their candidate's name on their ballots. Write me in for mayor in the next election!
2. To insert something in a text or document: I wrote in a disclaimer at the end of the article. You forgot to cite your sources for the paper, so I wrote them in for you.
3. To insert a character or scene into a narrative work: The editor insisted that the author write in a happy ending to the story. I revised the play and wrote some new characters in.
4. To communicate with some organization by mail: Please write in with a completed entry form.
See also: write

write off

v.
1. To cancel something from accounts as a loss: The bank has written off the account balance as an unrecoverable debt. After efforts to collect the payment failed, we decided to write it off. We wrote the trip off as a business expense.
2. To consider something a loss or failure: We wrote off the first day of our vacation because it rained all day. The doctors wrote him off when a treatment couldn't be found for his illness.
3. To deem someone or something inconsequential and disregard them: I wouldn't write off the option of going to nursing school. Critics wrote the singer off as a novelty act.
4. To send a written request: I wrote off to the university for an application.
See also: off, write

write out

v.
1. To express or compose something in writing: I wrote out a check for $70. It's easier to learn new words if you write them out and memorize them.
2. To write something in full or expanded form: The teacher wrote out the Latin abbreviations on the board and explained their meanings. The secretary took the shorthand notes and wrote them out.
3. To delete or exclude something or someone from a narrative work or record: In the revised version of the script, the playwright wrote out the character of the detective. The author wrote the scene out of the novel. Radical thinkers tend to be written out of history books.
See also: out, write
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

That’s all she wrote

and That’s what she wrote
sent. That is all of it. Here’s the last one we have to fix. There, that’s all she wrote.
See also: all, she, wrote

That’s what she wrote

verb
See also: she, what, wrote
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
I just wrote, "Loomis slashes his chest." I didn't say, "Well I know what I'm going to do.
I wrote constantly, beginning the novel Separate and Related, and I also wrote the first short story I "sold" that year--although I didn't begin trying to sell it until after I'd left grad school.
As long as he read his stories to the teacher and she wrote them down, there was no problem understanding what he had to say.
In a study of writing groups in a college classroom, McAllister (2005) found that students participating in collaborative writing groups were more active in sharing their ideas, attended class more frequently, and showed a higher improvement in their writing than did students who wrote individually.
"The Beckett tension is between the person and the mathematical zero," wrote the late literary critic Hugh Kenner in his groundbreaking Samuel Beckett: A Critical Study (1961), "hence his preoccupation with series and permutation, with the unique tenacities of declarative syntax, which so order and encase mute agonies, and with silence.
So he said he was only going to write prose, but by trying to do that he wrote A Notebook of a Return to My Native Land.
Another strategy, one favored by the first woman to be the dean of a medical school, Ann Preston of Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, was the masquerade or "cross-dressing." Preston's rhetorical ploy involved a simple subterfuge: in most of the college addresses and announcements she authored, frequently anonymously, she wrote as if there was nothing anomalous at all in the existence of a woman's medical college.
"The thing was, no one was writing these types of books for the African-American market." Gray returned to his book and wrote it from a Christian perspective.
The Ghosts of Versailles, the opera that I wrote with musician John Corigliano, took me about 12 years to complete.
For example, "The manager wrote the report" is active, and "The report was written by the manager" is passive.
Below are the words of a journal entry that I wrote just before I stumbled into writing a major portion of this article.
And often, we think that if you don't like the way we wrote something, you don't like us.
For instance, instead of "Bologna," he wrote "B I gn." Although aware of his spelling errors, the man still could not come up with any vowels.
In his final reflective letter, however, he wrote "even in class settings, my writing [style] can be acceptable.
Similarly, in "Gentle Companions: Single Women and their Letters in Late Stuart England," Susan Whyman provides notable profiles of women like Peg Adams who wrote to her Verney kin, "...