wrong

(redirected from wrongs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to wrongs: get it wrong
See:
References in classic literature ?
OEDIPUS They mark us both and understand that I Wronged by the deeds defend myself with words.
Equally right or wrong is he who says that Napoleon went to Moscow because he wanted to, and perished because Alexander desired his destruction, and he who says that an undermined hill weighing a million tons fell because the last navvy struck it for the last time with his mattock.
The lane down which they followed him was one of those that seem to be at the back of things, and look like the wrong side of the stage scenery.
"He is all ready to make up if you don't say much, for he owned to me he was wrong; but I don't think he will own it to you, in words," began Rose.
The mystery of the noises was out now; Affery, like greater people, had always been right in her facts, and always wrong in the theories she deduced from them.
SOCRATES: Dear Crito, your zeal is invaluable, if a right one; but if wrong, the greater the zeal the greater the danger; and therefore we ought to consider whether I shall or shall not do as you say.
"Wrong!" Mirabel exclaimed, in a tone of courteous surprise.
"I wish I was wrong, but--the clergyman--he has money of his own, or else he's paid; the poet or the musician--just the same; the tramp--he's no different.
"The shape of that paper, my friend, was the wrong shape; the wrong shape, if ever I have seen it in this wicked world."
But I was all wrong from the very first, and horrible wrong has come of it.
Which is all by the way, for you are wrong. It is a question neither of grammar nor ethics, but of fact."
"If vanity was a thing fit," says Square, "I might indulge some on the same occasion; for whence only he can have learnt his notions of right or wrong, I think is pretty apparent.
But virtue will never destroy what is virtuous; nor can what is right be the ruin of the state: therefore such a law can never be right, nor can the acts of a tyrant ever be wrong, for of necessity they must all be just; for he, from his unlimited power, compels every one to obey his command, as the multitude oppress the rich.
I could now see that I had been trebly in the wrong--wrong in hastily and cruelly suspecting an innocent woman; wrong in communicating my suspicions (without an attempt to verify them previously) to another person; wrong in accepting the flighty inferences and conclusions of Miserrimus Dexter as if they had been solid truths.
"But if you only have two chronometers, how can you tell which has gone wrong?" Captain Doane would demand.