wrest


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wrest (away) from (someone or something)

1. To take someone or something away from someone or something by pulling in a violent, wrenching manner. A noun or pronoun is used between "wrest" and "(away) from." The man has been hailed as a hero for wresting the gun away from the shooter before anyone was harmed. The officers wrested my son from me before I had the chance to run.
2. To manage to obtain control or possession of something through some battle, struggle, or conflict with someone or something else. A noun or pronoun is used between "wrest" and "(away) from." The rebels wrested power from the dictatorship after five years of war. The political party finally managed to wrest control of congress away from their opponents for the first time in 10 years. You'll have to wrest the kids away from me in the courts.
3. To obtain or extract something, such as information, from someone or something, especially after much difficulty or persistence. We were finally able to wrest some answers from the spy we were interrogating. I've never been able to wrest any meaning away from abstract paintings—they always look just like splatters of paint to me.
See also: wrest

wrest off

To take someone or something away from someone or something by pulling or prying in a violent, wrenching manner. A noun or pronoun is used between "wrest" and "off." He walked over to the headstone and wrested off the medallion that had been embedded in the marble. The man has been hailed as a hero for wresting the gun off of the shooter before anyone was harmed. The officers wrested my son off me before I had the chance to run.
See also: off, wrest

wrest out

1. To remove or take away someone or something by pulling or prying in a violent, wrenching manner. A noun or pronoun is used between "wrest" and "out." He wrested the gun out of the attacker's hands. I managed to wrest the iron bar out of the cement before it had set completely.
2. To obtain or extract something, such as information, from someone or something, especially after much difficulty or persistence. We were finally able to wrest some answers out of the spy we were interrogating. I've never been able to wrest any meaning out of abstract paintings—they always look just like splatters of paint to me. I wrested out a confession from Tommy after threatening to take his video games away for a year.
See also: out, wrest

wrest someone or something (away) from someone or something

to struggle to get someone or something from the grip of someone or something. The kidnappers wrested the baby from his mother and ran away with him. The policeman wrested the gun away from Lefty.
See also: wrest

wrest something off (of) something

 and wrest something off
to struggle to get something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Somehow he wrested the hubcap off the wheel. He wrested off the hubcap.
See also: off, wrest

wrest from

v.
1. To obtain something from someone or something by pulling with violent twisting movements: I wrested the hammer from his fist.
2. To usurp or obtain possession of something forcefully from someone or something: The duke wrested power from the monarchy.
3. To extract something from someone or something by or as if by force, twisting, or persistent effort: In class I struggled to wrest the meaning from an obscure poem.
See also: wrest

wrest off

v.
To obtain or remove something from someone or something by pulling with violent twisting movements: The thief wrested off the hood ornament from the car. I wrested the car keys off him.
See also: off, wrest

wrest out

v.
1. To obtain something from someone or something by pulling with violent twisting movements: The farmer dug into the soil and wrested out a fresh turnip. The bullies wrested the book out of the little boy's hands and ran off with it.
2. To extract something from someone or something by or as if by force, twisting, or persistent effort: I was finally able to wrest out some meaning from the jumbled essay. The police wrested a confession out of the suspect.
3. To escape from something by pulling with violent twisting movements: The cat wrested out of my arms and jumped to the floor.
See also: out, wrest
References in periodicals archive ?
When her alarm went off, she awoke to find Wrest in her bedroom.
A 41 square kilometres area was wrested by the neighbouring country in Kunar province, he told tribal elders from, Door Baba, Nazyan, Lalpura, Goshta, Momand Dara, Kooz Kunar (Khewa) and Dara-i-Noor districts.
2 : to obtain only by great and steady effort <"For this is the day we are to conquer His Majesty the Scarecrow, and wrest from him the throne." L.
PARKSTONE are making a determined bid to wrest the Carling CIU Games League Division One title away from champions Bell Green.
The borough had been battling to wrest the derelict site from Helmsely for several years and sued the owner to have it declared an area in need of redevelopment.
Twin little girl psychics seek to wrest control of the future of humanity's destiny, while the hidden secrets of a frozen dinosaur carcass may yet contain clues to make scientists dream.
It took $75-million in cost reductions at the plant since 1999, and improvements in both uptime and quality for GM's Saginaw Metal Casting Operations to wrest the new V8 away from competitors in Mexico.
Instead, she asserts that landlords used the reports of rebellions as political weapons to assert their control over nativist organizations that attempted to wrest control from the landlords.
It covers every aspect of the air war, from the first ground-attack missions following the Communist invasion of South Korea through the strategic bombing campaign using USAF B-29s, and the occasional but intense Communist efforts to wrest control of the air from United Nations forces.
The book shows us how Southerners, decisively whipped on the battlefield, managed, nevertheless, to wrest a victory on the intellectual, social, and economic fronts.
interfaith religious leaders meeting here that they must wrest the language of belief away from those "who concoct weapons out of religions."
It is unfathomable that he would attempt to take Martha Graham's work away from Martha Graham's company; he is no dancer; he has never known how it should be danced, and now he wishes to wrest it from the dancers who do.
While most Chinese mobile phone systems use the European GSM standard, the United States has managed to wrest an agreement from China to allow the U.S.-developed CDMA mobile phone system compete in the Chinese market.
Intel led unit sales for the third month in a row, as it continues to attempt to wrest control of the category from long-time market leader Logitech.
Jabbing sperm directly into flesh may have developed to circumvent female devices to control fertilization or wrest some unintended benefit from it, Michiels speculates.