wound

(redirected from wounded)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to wounded: Wounded Knee

pour salt in(to) the/(someone's) wound(s)

To make something that is already difficult, unpleasant, or painful even worse; to accentuate, aggravate, or intensify a negative situation, emotion, or experience (for someone). After losing the championship match, it really poured salt in John's wound for his girlfriend break up with him the next day. My pride was already hurting when I didn't get the job, but hearing that they gave it to Dave really poured salt into the wound. I can't believe you would ask me to pay you back on the day that I got laid off. Thanks for pouring salt in my wounds, man.
See also: pour, salt

salt in the/(one's) wound(s)

An aggravation that makes something unpleasant, difficult, or painful even worse. I can't believe Sally broke up with John the day after his team lost the championship match. Talk about salt in the wounds! My pride was already hurting when I didn't get the job, but it was like salt in my wound to hear that they gave it to Dave instead.
See also: salt

have (someone) wound around (one's) (little) finger

To have complete control, dominance, or mastery over somebody; to be able to make someone do whatever one wishes. The spoiled little brat has his parents completely wound around his little finger. Everyone accused her of getting the promotion by having the boss wound around her finger.
See also: around, finger, have, wound

have (someone) wound round (one's) (little) finger

To have complete control, dominance, or mastery over somebody; to be able to make someone do whatever one wishes. The spoiled little brat has his parents completely wound round his little finger. Everyone accused her of getting the promotion by having the boss wound round her finger.
See also: finger, have, round, wound

wind up in

To arrive someplace or in some situation, with the sense that getting there was not planned. My brother is a very spontaneous traveler and just spends his time in whatever country he winds up in! We had some time to kill before the concert, so we walked around and wound up in a coffee shop.
See also: up, wind

all wound up

Very tense and/or nervous. Jittery. A: "Why is Don pacing?" B: "I think he's all wound up because he's next to get a performance review."
See also: all, up, wound

time heals all wounds

Emotional pain lessens over time. I know it's hard to consider now, as you're grieving, but time heals all wounds. I'm sure you will reconcile with Kathleen eventually. After all, time heals all wounds.
See also: all, heal, time, wound

rub salt in(to) the/(one's) wound(s)

To make something that is already difficult, unpleasant, or painful even worse; to accentuate, aggravate, or intensify a negative situation, emotion, or experience (for someone). After losing the championship match, it really rubbed salt in John's wound for his girlfriend to break up with him the next day. My pride was already hurting when I didn't get the job, but hearing that they gave it to Dave really rubbed salt into the wound. I can't believe you would ask me to pay you back on the day that I got laid off. Thanks for rubbing salt in my wounds, man.
See also: rub, salt

open old wounds

To bring up or remind someone of a painful, tragic, or unfortunate past event or situation. Seeing Jessica with her new girlfriend opened a lot of old wounds this afternoon. The fight got pretty nasty, and we both started opening old wounds from years ago.
See also: old, open, wound

reopen old wounds

To bring up or remind someone of a painful, tragic, or unfortunate past event or situation. Seeing Jessica with her new girlfriend reopened a lot of old wounds this afternoon. The fight got pretty nasty, and we both started reopening old wounds from years ago.
See also: old, reopen, wound

twist the knife

To add to, exacerbate, or amplify a betrayal or wrong by further malicious actions. He said it was over, and then he twisted the knife and said he had never loved me.
See also: knife, twist

lick (one's) wounds

To withdraw after a misstep or defeat, in order to recover. I think the senator will be licking his wounds for awhile after that disastrous debate performance.
See also: lick, wound

wind down

1. To slow and near an ending. Our field hockey practice usually winds down with some gentle stretches.
2. To cause something to slow and near an ending. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wind" and "down." We'll wind down our practice with some gentle stretches.
See also: down, wind

wind up

1. verb Literally, to tighten the spring inside an item or device, as by twisting a knob. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wind" and "up." Let me try winding up your watch—maybe that will get it going again.
2. verb To cause someone or something to become more animated. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wind" and "up." Please don't wind the kids up right before bedtime.
3. verb To come to an end. The party wound up earlier than I'd expected, and I was in bed by 11.
4. verb To conclude something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wind" and "up." I was completely exhausted and decided to wind the party up early.
5. verb To cause someone to become anxious or agitated. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wind" and "up." Quit watching the news—it always winds you up.
6. verb To twist or coil something onto a particular surface or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wind" and "up." The cat will keep playing with that yarn, unless you wind it up on the spool.
7. verb To cause someone to talk at length and with enthusiasm. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wind" and "up." Shakespeare just winds her up—she could talk about his tragedies for hours.
8. verb To settle or resolve something. After I inherited all that money, I tried to wind up some of my outstanding debts.
9. verb To reach a certain place or state. I didn't plan to go to the grocery store—I just wound up there after running some other errands. Few inventors wind up having the kind of success you're hoping for.
10. verb To twist or contort one's body in preparation for an athletic maneuver (as of a pitcher in baseball). As I watch their pitcher wind up, I can't help but wonder if he's injured.
11. noun The act of twisting or contorting one's body in preparation for an athletic maneuver (as of a pitcher in baseball). In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated ("wind-up"). Look at their pitcher's wind-up—do you think he's injured?
See also: up, wind

lick one's wounds

Fig. to recover from a defeat or a rebuke. (Also literal for an animal.) After the terrible meeting and all the criticism, I went back to my office to lick my wounds.
See also: lick, wound

rub salt in a wound

Fig. to deliberately make someone's unhappiness, shame, or misfortune worse. Don't rub salt in the wound by telling me how enjoyable the party was. Bill is feeling miserable about losing his job and Bob is rubbing salt into the wound by saying how good his replacement is.
See also: rub, salt, wound

rub something in

Fig. to keep reminding one of one's failures; to nag someone about something. I like to rub it in. You deserve it! Why do you have to rub in everything I do wrong?
See also: rub

wind down

to start running or operating slower. Things will begin to wind down at the end of the summer. As things wind down, life will be a lot easier. The clock wound down and finally stopped.
See also: down, wind

wind someone up

 
1. Inf. Fig. to get someone excited. That kind of music really winds me up!
2. . Inf. Fig. to get someone set to do a lot of talking. (Fig. on winding up a clock.) The excitement of the day wound Kelly up and she talked almost all night. A good movie tends to wind me up for a while.
See also: up, wind

wind something down

to slow something down; to make something less hectic. Let's wind this party down and try to get people to go home. It's really late. We tried to wind down the party, but it kept running.
See also: down, wind

wind something up

 
1. Lit. to tighten the spring in something, such as a watch or a clock. Please wind your watch up nowbefore it runs down. Wind up your watch before you forget.
2. Fig. to conclude something. Today we'll wind that deal up with the bank. I have a few items of business to wind up. Then I'll be with you.
See also: up, wind

wind up (as) something

to end up as something. Roger wound up as a millionaire. He thought he would wind up a pauper.
See also: up, wind

wind up

somehow to end up in some fashion. I don't want to wind up broke and depressed. You don't want to wind up like Ted, do you?
See also: up, wind

wind up

(somewhere) Go to end up (somewhere).
See also: up, wind

lick one's wounds

Recuperate from injuries or hurt feelings. For example, They were badly beaten in the debate and went home sadly to lick their wounds. This expression alludes to an animal's behavior when wounded. It was originally put as lick oneself clean or whole, dating from the mid-1500s.
See also: lick, wound

rub in

Also, rub it in. Harp on something, especially an unpleasant matter, as in She always rubs in the fact that she graduated with honors and I didn't, or I know I forgot your birthday, but don't keep rubbing it in. This idiom alludes to the expression rub salt into a wound, an action that makes the wound more painful; it dates from medieval times and remains current. [Mid-1800s] Also see rub someone's nose in it.
See also: rub

wind down

Diminish gradually, draw to a close, as in By midnight the party had wound down. [Mid-1900s] Also see wind up.
See also: down, wind

wind up

1. Come or bring to a finish, as in The party was winding up, so we decided to leave, or Let's wind up the meeting and get back to work. [Early 1800s] Also see wind down.
2. Put in order, settle, as in She had to wind up her affairs before she could move. [Late 1700s]
3. Arrive somewhere following a course of action, end up, as in We got lost and wound up in another town altogether, or If you're careless with your bank account, you can wind up overdrawn. [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: up, wind

twist the knife

or

twist the knife in the wound

If someone twists the knife or twists the knife in the wound, they deliberately do or say something which make a situation even worse for someone who is upset or experiencing problems. Her daughter managed to twist the knife still further by claiming Nancy never loved her. To twist the knife in the wound, he appears to have cast doubt on whether Gray's invention was really his own idea. Note: You can also talk about a twist of the knife. Any cut-backs on the ceremony would be a further twist of the knife for bereaved families.
See also: knife, twist

rub salt into the wound

or

rub salt in the wound

COMMON If someone or something rubs salt into the wound or in the wound, they make a situation that is already bad for a person seem even worse. I wasn't allowed to eat anything for 24 hours before the operation so I was really hungry and just to rub salt into the wound, had to sit there while Zoe ate the most delicious-looking pizza. The police rubbed salt in the wounds by waving money in the strikers' faces, a reminder of all the overtime they were earning.
See also: rub, salt, wound

lick your wounds

COMMON If someone licks their wounds, they feel embarrassed and disappointed, especially after being defeated very easily. England's cricketers are licking their wounds after being soundly defeated in the second Test against Australia at Melbourne. Note: Some animals, such as dogs and cats, lick their wounds when they are injured.
See also: lick, wound

open old wounds

or

reopen old wounds

If something or someone opens old wounds or reopens old wounds, they remind you of an unpleasant experience in the past that you would prefer to forget. I didn't raise the subject again — I was in no hurry to open old wounds. It is said that the row is reopening old wounds among Conservative MPs.
See also: old, open, wound

twist (or turn) the knife

deliberately make someone's grief or problems worse.
1991 Mavis Nicholson Martha Jane & Me While she and I were playing the cat-and-mouse game of these stories, I would sometimes, just to twist the knife a little further, ask about the little girl's father.
See also: knife, twist

lick your wounds

retire to recover your strength or confidence after a defeat or humiliating experience.
See also: lick, wound

rub salt into the (or someone's) wound

make a painful experience even more painful for someone.
See also: rub, salt, wound

lick your ˈwounds

spend time trying to get your strength and confidence back after a defeat or disappointment: ‘He heard this morning that he hasn’t got the job.’ ‘Where is he?’ ‘Licking his wounds somewhere, probably.’
See also: lick, wound

reopen old ˈwounds

remind somebody of something unpleasant that happened or existed in the past: Look, let’s try not to reopen any old wounds this time, OK?
See also: old, reopen, wound

rub ˈsalt into the wound/into somebody’s wounds

make somebody who is already feeling upset, angry, etc. about something feel even worse: She was already upset about not getting the job, but when they gave it to one of her own trainees it really rubbed salt into the wound.
See also: rub, salt, wound

rub in

v.
1. To work something into a surface by rubbing: I put lotion on my hands and rubbed it in. Don't try to clean the shirt now—you will only rub in the stain.
2. To talk deliberately and excessively about something unpleasant in order to make another person feel bad: She always rubs in the fact that she has more money than me. I know I made a mistake—there's no need to rub it in.
See also: rub

wind down

v.
1. To diminish gradually in energy, intensity, or scope: The party wound down as guests began to leave.
2. To cause something to diminish in energy, intensity, or scope: We should wind down this meeting and go home. The discussions have been interesting, but now it's time to wind them down and go home.
See also: down, wind

wind up

v.
1. To coil the spring of some mechanism completely by turning a stem or cord, for example: I wound up my alarm clock. If you wind this toy soldier up, it will march across the floor.
2. To coil something completely, as onto a spool or into a ball: He wound the excess string up into a ball. She wound up the cable around the rod.
3. To come to a finish; end: The meeting wound up at 9:00.
4. To bring something to a finish; end something: We need to wind up this project before January. This card game is fun, but let's wind it up before dinner.
5. To put something in order; settle something: She wound up her affairs before leaving the country.
6. To arrive in some place or situation after or because of a course of action: I took a long walk and wound up at the edge of town. If you spend too much money now, you'll wind up in debt.
7. To distress or perturb someone or something mentally or emotionally: Seeing those awful newspaper headlines really winds me up. The students are getting wound up about all the homework they have.
8. To twist the body in preparation to throw or hit: The soccer player wound up and shot the ball into the net.
See also: up, wind

walking wounded

1. n. soldiers who are injured but still able to walk. (Standard English.) Many of the walking wounded helped with the more seriously injured cases.
2. n. a person who is injured—mentally or physically—and still able to go about daily life. The outpatient clinic was filled with the walking wounded.
3. n. stupid people in general. Most of network programming seems to be aimed at the walking wounded of our society.
See also: walking, wound

lick (one's) wounds

To recuperate after a defeat.
See also: lick, wound
References in classic literature ?
They had now arrived within sight of the little inn and could see on the opposite side the procession bearing the wounded man and guided by Monsieur d'Arminges.
There is the wounded man," said De Guiche, passing close to the Augustine brother.
The young men rode up to the wounded man to announce that they were followed by the priest.
At this moment the wounded man arrived from one direction and the monk from the other, the latter dismounting from his mule and desiring that it should be taken to the stables without being unharnessed.
No, but look," replied the hostess, pointing to the wounded man; "I ask you if you recognize him?
The room was inundated with blood, dripping from the mattresses upon which lay the wounded man, speechless; the monk had disappeared.
The host clasped his hands and looked around him suspiciously, whilst Grimaud knit his brows and approached the wounded man, whose worn, hard features awoke in his mind such awful recollections of the past.
And Achilles answered, "Noble son of Menoetius, man after my own heart, I take it that I shall now have the Achaeans praying at my knees, for they are in great straits; go, Patroclus, and ask Nestor who it is that he is bearing away wounded from the field; from his back I should say it was Machaon son of Aesculapius, but I could not see his face for the horses went by me at full speed.
When the old man saw him he sprang from his seat, seized his hand, led him into the tent, and bade him take his place among them; but Patroclus stood where he was and said, "Noble sir, I may not stay, you cannot persuade me to come in; he that sent me is not one to be trifled with, and he bade me ask who the wounded man was whom you were bearing away from the field.
He recks not of the dismay that reigns in our host; our most valiant chieftains lie disabled, brave Diomed, son of Tydeus, is wounded; so are Ulysses and Agamemnon; Eurypylus has been hit with an arrow in the thigh, and I have just been bringing this man from the field--he too wounded with an arrow.
When he had got as far as the ships of Ulysses, where was their place of assembly and court of justice, with their altars dedicated to the gods, Eurypylus son of Euaemon, met him, wounded in the thigh with an arrow, and limping out of the fight.
All they that were princes among us are lying struck down and wounded at the hands of the Trojans, who are waxing stronger and stronger.
Our men were tired with the execution, and killed or mortally wounded in the two fights about one hundred and eighty of them; the rest, being frightened out of their wits, scoured through the woods and over the hills, with all the speed that fear and nimble feet could help them to; and as we did not trouble ourselves much to pursue them, they got all together to the seaside, where they landed, and where their canoes lay.
I have literally hundreds of wounded veterans from Iraq, Afghanistan and other battlefronts who need the DAV's help.
Marine Corps found that insurgents, although fatally wounded in the chest, still could move forward and issue a final blow from their edged weapons, seriously wounding or killing Marines.