work it


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work (someone or something)

1. informal To manipulate or exploit someone or something to one's own advantage. I learned from a young age how to work the system to suit my needs. He's been working the boss for months in order to gain access to the financial records.
2. informal To arouse, gratify, or enchant someone, especially a group, in an artful manner meant to influence them in a particular way. As a comedian, you have to know how to work the audience, no matter what they're like. My daughter knows how cute she is, and she is now a master at working the people around her for attention.
See also: work

work it

1. slang To dress, walk, and behave in a way that shows off one's body or clothing in the best way possible. Often said as a compliment or encouragement. Work it, girl! You are looking fine in that little red dress! Damn, he looks really hot in that outfit, and he's working it on the dance floor!
2. slang To be very successful and self-confident in the pursuit of one's goals or ambitions. Often said as a compliment or encouragement. With so much to juggle these days and worry about these days, it's important to take a moment and recognize parents who rise to the task. Work it, you super moms and dads!
See also: work

work it so (that) (something is the case)

To arrange, organize, or plan something so as to bring about a particular result or outcome. I'm trying to work it so I'll be able to work from home on Fridays. We worked it so that both of our flights will get into the airport at the same time. That way we can share a taxi home.
See also: work

work things so (that) (something is the case)

To arrange, organize, or plan something so as to bring about a particular result or outcome. I'm trying to work things so I'll be able to work from home on Fridays. We worked things so that both of our flights will get into the airport at the same time. That way we can share a taxi home.
See also: thing, work
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

work it

Arrange, bring about, as in We'll try to work it so that the board meets tomorrow. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
See also: work
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ˈwork it/things (so that...)

(informal) plan something carefully to get the result you want; organize or arrange something: Can you work it so that we get free tickets?I worked things so that I could take all my leave in July and August.
See also: thing, work
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
It's a very friendly week and although it's work it's relaxing and my wife Liz comes with me so we make it a bit of a holiday.
Like all their work it's brilliantly imaginative, very silly and seriously funny.
Assume car electrification will start in London and work it's way up north like most other improvements!
If the signings come in and they don't work it's Jurgen's fault but if they do he gets the pat on the back.
Great news on cemeteries work IT'S great to know that at last work will be done on the cemeteries at Key Hill and Warstone Lane.
Dear Clive My employer doesn't listen when I tell him I've got too much work it's stressing me out and it just ends up that I have more to do in less time.
And as work it's a dead cert that you'll need hankies on stand-by.
After a hard week at work it's tempting to lie around and do nothing and feel worse.
I wouldn't say I have a specific style - for work it's a suit, so outside of work it's generally quite laid back.
He also knows that hard work pays off: "Promoters nowadays don't want to work It's a very simple game: You put work in, people are gonna come." He should know: In 2005, Barnes renovated his D.C.
"I know I said split captaincy probably wouldn't work but if it's going to work it's going to work with someone like me because I'm pretty chilled, I do it in a different manner to a lot of other people and I'm very committed to continuing as the Test captain as long as the team want me," stressed Vaughan.
But Shadow Home Secretary David Davis said that the Government had failed to answer a series of Tory concerns about the scheme, warning: 'Well I think if it's not going to work it's not worth supporting.'