wore


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Related to wore: wore out
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wear rose-colored glasses

To assume an unduly optimistic and cheerful attitude (toward something); to focus solely or primarily on the positive aspects (of something). Primarily heard in US. Many of us wear rose-colored glasses when we think back to our childhoods. It's part of the reason nostalgia is such a powerful emotional draw. I find it a little irksome how you always wear rose-colored glasses, even in the worst of times!
See also: glass, wear

wear sackcloth and ashes

To act in a way that shows one's penitence or remorse for one's misdeeds or poor behavior. Darren has been wearing sackcloth and ashes ever since his girlfriend broke up with him for cheating on her. There's no way to turn back time on the way I treated my brother growing up. All I can do now is wear sackcloth and ashes.
See also: and, ash, sackcloth, wear

wear too many hats

business slang To hold too many responsibilities or assume too many roles at the same time. One of the pitfalls many entrepreneurs fall into when setting up a new company is to wear too many hats, which not only spreads themselves very thin, but ends up being counterproductive to the operation as a whole.
See also: hat, many, wear

wear the bull's feather

To have an adulterous wife; to be cuckolded. The cuckold is traditionally associated with horns, and a "bull's feather" was once a term for a horn. I never thought I would wear the bull's feather, but it's true—my wife cheated on me.
See also: feather, wear

wear the cap and bells

To provide humor and merriment (sometimes by acting as a target for mockery). The phrase refers to the hat adorned with bells that court jesters once wore. Sean will wear the cap and bells—you can always count on him to liven up a party. I guess I'm wearing the cap and bells today because they are having a great time ridiculing me.
See also: and, bell, cap, wear

wear the horns

To have an adulterous wife; to be cuckolded. The cuckold is traditionally associated with horns. I never thought I would wear the horns, but it's true—my wife cheated on me.
See also: horn, wear

wear the willow

To grieve. The willow tree is traditionally associated with sadness. My grandmother has been wearing the willow ever since my grandfather died. I wore the willow after my true love married another man.
See also: wear, willow

wear several hats

To hold or function in more than one position or role. I work from home, so I'm able to wear several hats: stay-at-home dad, soccer coach, and website developer. Both our editorial assistant and our copywriter left the company at the same time, so I've been wearing several hats ever since.
See also: hat, several, wear

wear (one's particular profession's) hat

To act as one would in one's particular profession while in a different setting. Bobby, I know you're off duty, but can you please wear your doctor's hat for five minutes and tell me what's wrong with my arm? I don't want to have to go to the hospital. My wife was still wearing her judge's hat when she tried to intervene with our neighbor's arguing kids.
See also: hat, particular, wear

wear out (one's) welcome

1. To remain a guest in a place, especially someone's home, for too long, to the point where the host no longer wishes one to stay. After the cool reception I received at breakfast, it was apparent that I had worn out my welcome at the cottage of my father's friend.
2. By extension, to do something that makes one no longer welcome in or at a place. Things were going fine at the dinner meeting until my coworker made an off-color joke, at which point it seemed that we had worn out our welcome.
See also: out, wear, welcome

wear (one's) fingers to the bone

To work excessively hard. Likened to literally wearing the skin off of one's hands. I have worn my fingers to the bone renovating this house, and I'm glad to say that it has all been worth it. You have everyone wearing their fingers to the bone. You need to give them a break or they'll burn out.
See also: bone, finger, wear

wear (something) on (one's) sleeve

To openly display or make known one's belief, value, emotion, or sentiment. Most commonly seen as "wear (one's) heart on (one's) sleeve," which comes from Shakespeare's Othello. Love him or hate him, Larry always wears his heart on his sleeve, and you always know exactly where he stands. My father was always very closed off regarding his feelings, so when I had kids, I made a point of wearing my love for them on my sleeve.
See also: on, sleeve, wear

wear the trousers

To be in charge in a relationship or family. The phrase is typically applied to a woman. Trousers were historically only worn by men, who were traditionally the decision makers. I think it's pretty obvious who wears the trousers in that family—Grandma Helene. Actually, in our relationship, we both wear the trousers—we make decisions together.
See also: trouser, wear

wear (one's) heart on (one's) sleeve

To openly display or make known one's emotions or sentiments. My father was always very closed off regarding his feelings, so when I had kids, I made a point of wearing my heart on my sleeve with them. The senator has begun wearing his heart on his sleeve now that he's not seeking re-election.
See also: heart, on, sleeve, wear

wear out

1. To cause to become worn, as from frequent or rough use. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wear" and "out." Coming to abrupt stops like that is really going to wear out your breaks. It's amazing how quick my kids wear their shoes out.
2. To exhaust one. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wear" and "out." You forgot how much standing all day can really wear you out. I'm going to try to wear out the toddlers so they go right to sleep tonight.
See also: out, wear

wear thin

1. Of an object, often a fabric, to physically become thinner or cause to become worn, as from frequent use. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wear" and "thin." You can see here how the leather has been worn thin by years of use.
2. To diminish or become less effective. Please try to behave. My patience is beginning to wear thin. It was cute the first few times that he did it, but his little routine has worn thin.
See also: thin, wear

wear motley

old-fashioned To be or act very foolish. "Motley" refers to the type of clothes court jesters traditionally wore, having different colors in different areas of patches. But I suspect it will be the president wearing motley in the end if his signature tax bill turns into the disaster many analysts are predicting.
See also: wear

wear the green willow

To grieve for lost or unrequited love. The willow tree is traditionally associated with sadness. My grandmother has been wearing the green willow ever since my grandfather died. I wore the green willow after my true love married another man.
See also: green, wear, willow

wear (oneself) to a frazzle

To make oneself exhausted and anxious through too much work, effort, or worry. I wore myself to a frazzle trying to accommodate all our relatives over Christmas. It was nice having them here, but I'm so glad they're gone! They're wearing themselves to a frazzle with how overprotective they are of their kids.
See also: frazzle, wear

wear (oneself) to a shadow

To make oneself exhausted and anxious through too much work. I wore myself to a shadow trying to accommodate all our relatives over Christmas. It was nice having them here, but I'm so glad they're gone! My brother is wearing himself to a shadow trying to run his own business.
See also: shadow, wear

wear out

to become worn from use; to become diminished or useless from use. My car engine is about to wear out. It takes a lot of driving to wear out an engine.
See also: out, wear

wear someone out

Fig. to exhaust someone; to make someone tired. The coach made the team practice until he wore them out. If he wears out everybody on the team, nobody will be left to play in the game.
See also: out, wear

wear something out

to make something worthless or nonfunctional from use. I wore my shoes out in no time at all. I wore out my shoes in less than a month.
See also: out, wear

wear out

1. Become or cause to become unusable through long or heavy use, as in She wears out her shoes in no time, or The coupling in this device has worn out. [Early 1400s]
2. Exhaust, tire, as in I was worn out from packing all those books. Also see tired out. [First half of 1500s]
See also: out, wear

wear thin

1. Be weakened or diminished gradually, as in My patience is wearing thin. [Late 1800s]
2. Become less convincing, acceptable, or popular, as in His excuses are wearing thin. [First half of 1990s] Both usages transfer the thinning of a physical object, such as cloth, to nonmaterial characteristics.
See also: thin, wear

wear the trousers

BRITISH or

wear the pants

If one person in a couple wears the trousers or wears the pants, they make all the important decisions. She may give the impression that she wears the trousers but it's actually Tim who makes all the big decisions. My father said he wanted to discuss the investment with my mother, to which the salesman demanded, `Who wears the pants in your family?' Note: This expression is usually used about women who seem to control their husbands or partners.
See also: trouser, wear

wear motley

play the fool.
Motley was the name given to the particoloured clothes worn by a court jester in former times.
See also: wear

wear the trousers

be the dominant partner in a marriage or the dominant person in a household. informal
See also: trouser, wear

wear the green willow

1 grieve for the loss of a loved one. 2 suffer unrequited love. literary
A willow branch or leaves traditionally symbolized grief or unrequited love. In Othello , Desdemona sings the mournful ‘willow song’, about a maid forsaken by her lover, shortly before she is murdered.
See also: green, wear, willow

wear ˈthin

begin to become less; become less interesting or amusing: My patience is beginning to wear very thin.Don’t you think that joke’s wearing a bit thin? (= we have heard it many times before)
See also: thin, wear

wear the ˈtrousers

(British English) (American English wear the ˈpants) (often disapproving) (especially of a woman) be the partner in a marriage who makes the decisions and tells the other person what to do: It’s not difficult to see who wears the trousers in their house!
See also: trouser, wear

wear out

v.
1. To become unusable through long or heavy use: The tent wore out after last summer's trip.
2. To make something unusable through long or heavy use: The tough job wore out my saw. Miles of hiking wore my shoes out.
3. To make someone weary; exhaust someone: The children wore me out. The class wore out the substitute teacher.
4. Chiefly Southern US To punish by spanking: If you don't behave, I'm going to have to wear you out.
See also: out, wear

wear thin

1. To be weakened or eroded gradually: Her patience is wearing thin.
2. To become less convincing, acceptable, or popular, as through repeated use: excuses that are wearing thin.
See also: thin, wear
References in periodicals archive ?
Mischa Barton of ``The OC'' wore a nude-colored slip gown covered in beads.
Sex and the City'' star Sarah Jessica Parker wore a strapless black tea-length dress with a feathered skirt and black sash, while Laura Linney, a ``Frasier'' guest star last season, wore a black Prada dress with black beads.
But she says her daughter wore it because Paris Hilton does.
Many wore a less-formal tux look with white shirt and long black tie instead of a bow tie.
That's what it's all about,'' said Kenneth Lucas, a Los Angeles native who wore his $325 Carmelo Anthony/Syracuse jersey to Jam Session.
She wore a tanned leather Dolce & Gabbana micro-mini dress slashed and tasseled all over.
The president himself, President Josiah Bartlet that is, wore a dove of peace.
The clothes aren't labeled, says Nappi, but true fans will know who wore what.
They're even considering orchid corsages pinned to their dresses, much as their grandmothers wore them in the '50s.
Kidman wore a Chanel pink-chiffon, spaghetti-strap gown with tiers of ruffles running down the bodice.
5 -- color) For public appearances, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans wore matching ensembles that sparkled under the arena lights.
Bush set the trend in motion when he wore a traditional cap-toe black dress style called Park Avenue for his presidential inauguration.