wordplay


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wordplay

The use of words in a clever or amusing way, as seen in puns or double entendres. A: "Why was six afraid of seven? Because seven ate nine! Get it?" B: "Ah yes, wordplay with 'eight' and 'ate'—a classic."
References in periodicals archive ?
Early modern wordplay ends up having a telos after all: it aims at subverting the ruling formation, particularly by the ingenious tactic of drawing attention to the artifice of what the dominant center would pass off as true by nature (12-15).
(8) For another Latin text that contains an underlying wordplay in Greek, see D.
Editing the column taught me more aout wordplay than I'd ever dreamed possible.
"I enjoy wordplay, puns and the sense of general nonsensical silliness which I think is naturally a part of Welsh humour and the way English is misused to comic effect by the Welsh.
If "Wordplay" is largely a triumph of superior content over merely serviceable form, Brian Oakes' titling and graphics design nevertheless devises ingenious visual strategies to illustrate the process of puzzle-solving, creating a play-along interactivity that audiences will find stimulating, if not intimidating.
At school, my devotion to this type of wordplay irritated my fellow A-level English pupils so much they made me promise to give up punning for Lent.
Lisa Hopkins' article, "Writing to Control," describes the influence of Ronsard and the Pleiade on Mary's poetry and explains her sense of intricate wordplay and control of time and space, qualities and motifs that Mary expressed throughout her lifetime commitment to writing poetry.
Everything seems futile, save the dandylike celebration of idleness, the wordplay that slithers between the deliberately uncertain brushstrokes.
Woodson emphasizes that these novels are "tapestr[ies] of wordplay" in which names are intended to be read as ciphers.
From then on, the poem tumbles through line after line of wordplay that is at once fun and profound, teasing theological depths out of everyday idioms in such a disarmingly bright way that we can only gasp out a laughing "Wow!" by the end -- which is precisely the experience Norris wants to give us of Jesus.
I greatly enjoyed immersing myself in James O'Hara's fantasticary learned [True.supp.B**] Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay.[1] The wordplays in question are mostly those perceived (or so presented) by the ancients as `etymological' (the modern linguistic accuracy of these being of course irrelevant, 58), although a few `not strictly etymological' plays creep in by the back door.
The danger lies in vacuous wordplay, but Schippers's poems - more precisely, his constructions - generally leave the reader thinking, or at least with the impression that there is something here to be thought about.
The dance, by George Faison, its title a wordplay on "idle obsession," is a narrative rendering of the recent headline-grabbing tale of an employee (and fan gone wrong) who murdered the rising pop star.
It tells a basically simple story in an extremely and marvelously complicated style abounding in wordplay, logographs, double entendres, and the like.
WordPlay will feature more than 100 dancers who have been rehearsing for weeks in South Shields, Sunderland, Newcastle and Boldon Colliery.