woof

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Related to woofs: WOFS

buy a/(one's) woof ticket

To challenge or respond hostilely to one's threats of violence or menacing, boastful words. Don't buy his woof ticket—I know for a fact that he carries a knife and would be all too happy to put it to use.
See also: buy, ticket, woof

sell a woof ticket

To threaten or try to intimidate someone with menacing, boastful words. There's this guy in the bar, drunk off his head, going around selling a woof ticket to anyone who'll listen. He's going to get himself knocked out if he's not careful. If he tries to sell you a woof ticket, don't rise to it. I know for a fact that he carries a knife and would be all too happy to put it to use.
See also: sell, ticket, woof

sell woof tickets

To threaten or try to intimidate someone with threats of violence or menacing, boastful words. There's this guy in the bar, drunk off his head, going around selling woof tickets to anyone who'll listen. He's going to get himself knocked out if he's not careful. If he tries to sell you woof tickets, don't rise to it—I know for a fact that he carries a knife and would be all too happy to put it to use.
See also: sell, ticket, woof

warp and woof

The integral, fundamental aspects, elements, or constructs of something. Personal independence has been the warp and woof of our nation's identity since its inception. The examples set by our parents form the warp and woof of our lives.
See also: and, warp, woof

woof cookies

slang To vomit, especially violently or profusely. A pronoun is often used between "woof" and "cookies." With the way that boat was rocking back and forth, I felt like I was going to woof cookies over the side at any minute. My roommate came back from his birthday celebrations and promptly started woofing his cookies into the trash can.
See also: cooky, woof
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

warp and woof

The underlying structure or foundation of something, as in He foresaw great changes in the warp and woof of the nation's economy. This expression, used figuratively since the second half of the 1500s, alludes to the threads that run lengthwise ( warp) and crosswise ( woof) in a woven fabric.
See also: and, warp, woof
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

buy someone’s woof ticket

tv. to challenge someone’s boast or taunt. (Also spelled wolf.) He’s such a fighter. He’ll buy anybody’s woof ticket.
See also: buy, ticket, woof

sell a woof ticket

and sell woof tickets
tv. to boast, bluff, or lie. (Originally black. Also spelled wolf. Compare this with buy someone’s woof ticket.) Freddie is out selling woof tickets again.
See also: sell, ticket, woof

sell woof tickets

verb
See also: sell, ticket, woof

woof

(wʊf)
1. in. to boast; to sell a woof ticket; to chatter. (Black.) They’re just woofing. Ignore them.
2. in. to vomit. (Onomatopoetic.) Somebody woofed on our driveway.

woof cookies

tv. to vomit. Waldo had to woof cookies in the bushes.
See also: cooky, woof
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to the company, 'No More Woof' is its 'most revolutionary invention' up to date.
Market analysts Datamonitor say Woofs have a relatively high degree of financial security and high disposable incomes.
Their report says the over-50s come in three main varieties: Woofs, the Youthfully Spirited and Self Preservationists.
Woofs will readily splash out on new cars, furniture and holidays, while the Youthfully Spirited group consists of those who are experimental in their purchases but who are less well off than Woofs.
Woofs are ready to spend on new cars, furniture, holidays and high- quality food and drink, says a report by market analysts Datamonitor.
And the Lychnis is identified: "Campion, cuckoo flower, ragged robin." Moorman, who offers abundant, though shorter, notes--usually one to five per page, and more conveniently placed as footnotes (in contrast to Woofs endnotes)--has nothing to say about the passage.
Pamela Woof (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991), xxii + 273 pp., $59.00 cloth.
Pamela Woof has gone back to the manuscript owned by the Wordsworth Trust (as did Moorman), and there are numerous slight differences between the two editions.
Wallington Woofs is a day dedicated to dogs with classes including the dog with the waggiest tail, the cutest puppy, the dog with the saddest eyes and the dog that looks most like its owner.
More than 1,000 people attended the previous Wallington Woofs event, many of whom brought along their pet pooch.
FUN DAY More than 1,000 people attended the last Wallington Woofs event