wolf in sheep's clothing


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a wolf in sheep's clothing

A person or thing that appears harmless but is actually dangerous or bad. Don't trust Dana—she's a wolf in sheep's clothing who will try to steal your position if given the chance. The politician portrayed himself as moderate, but turned out to be a wolf in sheep's clothing with a radical agenda.
See also: clothing, wolf
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wolf in sheep's clothing

Fig. a dangerous person pretending to be harmless. Carla thought the handsome stranger was gentle and kind, but Susan suspected he was a wolf in sheep's clothing. Mimi: Why shouldn't I go out with David? He's the nicest man I've ever met. Alan: He's a wolf in sheep's clothing, Mimi. Can't you tell?
See also: clothing, wolf
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wolf in sheep's clothing

An enemy disguised as a friend, as in Dan was a wolf in sheep's clothing, pretending to help but all the while spying for our competitors . This term comes from the ancient fable about a wolf that dresses up in the skin of a sheep and sneaks up on a flock. This fable has given rise to a rich history of allusions as in the Sermon on the Mount when Jesus speaks of false prophets in sheep's clothing, "but inwardly they are ravening wolves" (Matthew 7:15).
See also: clothing, wolf
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wolf in sheep's clothing

One who feigns congeniality while actually holding malevolent intentions.
See also: clothing, wolf
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wolf in sheep's clothing, a

An enemy masquerading as a friend. The term comes from Aesop’s fable about a wolf dressing up as a shepherd (in some versions, as a sheep) and sneaking up on the flock. In the Bible, Jesus warns of “false prophets which come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly they are ravening wolves” (Matthew 7:15). The expression has appealed to hundreds of writers. Clare Boothe Luce (Kiss the Boys Good-bye, 1939) used it to describe a predatory male collegian: “A wolf with a sheepskin.”
See also: wolf
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
But the version standing haughtily at the kerbside was the Bora Sport TDI 130bhp, which is a wolf in sheep's clothing.
"I am a wolf in sheep's clothing and if somebody is disrespecting what I am saying to them then there's going to be fireworks, I can tell you."
WOLVES - AND an alleged wolf in sheep's clothing - have produced surprising public outcries lately.
His first appearance in the book is literally as a wolf in sheep's clothing, "decked out in a fleecy white suit and a lopsided fedora." Monroe's depiction of his first violation of the little girl is appropriately horrifying.
There is Eugene, a well-intentioned husband and father unable to conquer a tendency toward homosexuality; Reverend Woods, a wolf in sheep's clothing, is all too willing to sacrifice his soul on the altar of political gain; Basil atones for his part in Mattie Michael's displacement by marrying an irresponsible mother of two; the autistic Jerome, a talented pianist whose blues playing rivals that of Jelly Roll Morton or Count Basie, is cursed with a mother who exploits his gift for monetary gain; the street-wise C.
"Previous work had suggested that pheomelanin could be a wolf in sheep's clothing," says Liebler.
is a wolf in sheep's clothing. He is not what he pretends to be."
Sheep typically represent the chosen flock of the Good Shepherd; they may be deceived by a 'wolf in sheep's clothing',(9) or stand contrasted to the less faithful goats.
THE CHANCELLOR Osborne is a wolf in sheep's clothing attacking the most vulnerable elderly, urging them to cash in meagre pension pots and risk being left without enough to see them through retirement.