wives


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a good husband makes a good wife

If a husband treats his wife well, she will treat him well in return. I do the dishes because it gives Shannon much needed time to relax, and a good husband makes a good wife.
See also: good, husband, make, wife

old wives' tale

A now-debunked story or idea that was once believed, often superstitiously. How can you believe in that old wives' tale? Oh, that's just an old wives' tale! A broken mirror does not guarantee seven years' bad luck.
See also: old, tale

A good husband makes a good wife.

 and A good Jack makes a good Jill.
Prov. If a husband or man wants his wife or girlfriend to be respectful and loving to him, he should be respectful and loving to her. Don't blame your wife for being short-tempered with you; you've been so unpleasant to her lately. A good husband makes a good wife.
See also: good, husband, make, wife

old wives' tale

Fig. a myth or superstition. You really don't believe that stuff about starving a cold do you? It's just an old wives' tale.
See also: old, tale

old wives' tale

A superstition, as in Toads cause warts? That's an old wives' tale. This expression was already known in ancient Greece, and a version in English was recorded in 1387. Despite invoking bigoted stereotypes of women and old people, it survives.
See also: old, tale

an old wives' tale

COMMON An old wives' tale is a belief that a lot of people have that is based on traditional ideas, often ones which have been proved to be incorrect. My mother used to tell me to feed a cold and starve a fever. Is it just an old wives' tale? It's not just an old wives' tale, you know, that full moons and madness go together.
See also: old, tale

an old wives' tale

a widely held traditional belief that is now thought to be unscientific or incorrect.
The phrase (and its earlier variant old wives' fable ) is recorded from the early 16th century, with the earliest example being from Tyndale's translation of the Bible.
See also: old, tale

an old ˈwives’ tale

(disapproving) an old idea or belief that has proved not to be scientific: When you’re expecting a baby, people tell you all sorts of old wives’ tales.The belief that make-up ruins your skin is just an old wives’ tale.
See also: old, tale
References in periodicals archive ?
Created after World War II to assist the wives and children of the more than 400,000 Americans who gave the ultimate sacrifice, DIC has undergone a number of revisions.
105) To the contrary, in the cases of the depressive killers at least, the very intensity of the new affective ties between the men and their wives and children may have helped to transform simple suicides into mass murders.
Another way wives keep their husbands healthy is by keeping them out of bars and other single-life social activities, Arond said.
Examining 121 cases of husband desertion from the records of these three judicial systems from the fourteenth to early sixteenth centuries, this paper will highlight cases of wives who refused to remain in unsatisfactory marriages.
Some of the women might have been widows, but some probably were wives of the men with whom they camped.
A similar mortality pattern appeared among wives of hospitalized men, although their death rates were slightly lower than those of men.
Handbooks for military wives suggest that they should not complain to husbands overseas because it is their responsibility to help strengthen their spouses' morale.
He claimed that Shireen could not manage her affairs like other wives and mothers and he felt his position to be strong.
First, the rules concerning the warning given by a husband to his wife regarding his suspicion that she has been unfaithful; second, the rules regarding a husband's ability to require that his wife undergo the ritual for wives suspected of unfaithfulness; and, third, a description of the warning and what action on the wife's part constitutes an act which violates the terms of that warning.
Camargo joins a circle of Latin America power wives who have turned tattletale in recent years.
CE talked to 12 husbands and wives about the evolving role--and the reality us.
As married women have become increasingly likely to work in recent decades, their contribution to family earnings has grown as well--indeed, in 20 to 25 percent of dual-earner couples, wives earn more than their husbands; these trends may have affected family decisionmaking, giving some women more input into family financial and career decisions
As Gildenhuys explains, the repeated instances of gullible men may qualify somewhat the narrator's stereotypically negative appraisal of women and create an atmosphere which vaguely "celebrate[s] the proficiency of the wives in achieving their ends" (39).
One of my sisters-in-law maintained that, in general, women are more virtuous - "After all, aren't men much more likely to beat their wives and children, commit murder, embezzle, drive drunk, and be criminals of all types?