withdraw

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Related to withdraws: at least, call for

go into (one's) shell

1. To retreat into one's mind or otherwise isolate oneself so as to avoid undesirable thoughts, situations, or interactions with people. After getting mugged I went into my shell and didn't speak to anyone for nearly a week. I'm not good around large groups of people; I usually just go into my shell and wait until I can be alone. Don't go into your shell because you don't want an argument—talk to me and let's discuss the problem!
2. To act in a reserved and/or defensive manner. The team went into their shells after half time, trying to protect a slim lead. The senator went into his shell when reporters tried to question him about allegations of tax fraud.
See also: go, shell

retreat into (one's) shell

1. To retreat into one's mind or otherwise isolate oneself so as to avoid undesirable thoughts, situations, or interactions with people. After getting mugged I retreated into my shell and didn't speak to anyone for nearly a week. I'm not good around large groups of people. I usually just retreat into my shell and wait until I can be alone. Don't retreat into your shell because you don't want an argument—talk to me and let's discuss the problem!
2. To act in a reserved and/or defensive manner. The team retreated into their shells after halftime, trying to protect a slim lead. The senator retreated into his shell when reporters tried to question him about allegations of tax fraud.
See also: retreat, shell

withdraw from (something)

1. To retract or shrink back from someone or something. The nervous animal withdrew from the man entering its cage. He withdrew from my hand as I reached across to wipe the dirt from his face. I had to withdraw from the bright lights due to my migraine.
2. To depart, retreat, or retire from something or some place, as for rest or seclusion. We withdrew from the noisy party to get some fresh air in the summer evening. No one noticed that Bob had withdrawn from the meeting room just before the boss started demanding explanations for the low sales.
3. To cease to be associated with some group or activity; to remove oneself from active participation in something. He was forced to withdraw from the competition amid the accusations of cheating. She is refusing to withdraw from the board of directors.
4. To take someone or something out of or away from something; to remove someone or something from something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "withdraw" and "from." I hastily withdrew my hand from the box when Mary said there could be spiders inside. She withdrew an old photograph from her father's desk drawer. Someone withdrew $400 from my account this morning, and it certainly wasn't me.
5. To cause or force someone or something to depart, retreat, or flee from something or some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "withdraw" and "from." They have begun withdrawing troops from the war-torn region. Please withdraw your agents from our offices immediately.
6. To remove someone or something from active consideration or participation in something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "withdraw" and "from." I'm afraid I must withdraw my application from the process, as it could be seen as a conflict of interest. The party has withdrawn its candidate from the election.
See also: withdraw

withdraw into (one's) shell

1. To retreat into one's mind or otherwise isolate oneself so as to avoid undesirable thoughts, situations, or interactions with people. After getting mugged I withdrew into my shell and didn't speak to anyone for nearly a week. I'm not good around large groups of people. I usually just withdraw into my shell and wait until I can be alone. Don't withdraw into your shell because you don't want an argument—talk to me and let's discuss the problem!
2. To act in a reserved and/or defensive manner. The team withdrew into their shells after halftime, trying to protect a slim lead. The senator withdrew into his shell when reporters tried to question him about allegations of tax fraud.
See also: shell, withdraw

withdraw into (oneself)

To retreat into one's mind or otherwise isolate oneself so as to avoid undesirable thoughts, situations, or interactions with people. After getting mugged, he withdrew into himself and didn't speak to anyone for nearly a week. I'm not good around large groups of people. I usually get overwhelmed and just withdraw into myself. Don't withdraw into yourself just because you don't want an argument—talk to me!
See also: withdraw

withdraw into (something)

1. To retreat, retract, or shrink back into something or some place. The clam withdraws into its shell when it senses a threat. The soldiers withdrew into the jungle after their assault on the enemy camp. This kind of spider withdraws into its burrow and waits for prey to pass by.
2. To pull or retract something back into something or some place. I withdrew my hands into the sleeves of my sweatshirt to keep them warm. Cats are able to retract their claws into their toe pads.
See also: withdraw
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

withdraw from something

 
1. to depart from something physically. I withdrew from the smoky room and ran to the open window to get some air. I withdrew from the unpleasant-looking cafe and looked for something more to my liking.
2. . to end one's association with someone or something. I decided to withdraw from all my professional organizations. I had to withdraw from the association because the dues had become too high.
See also: withdraw

withdraw into oneself

to become introverted; to concern oneself with one's inner thoughts. After a few years of being ignored, she withdrew into herself. I have to struggle to keep from withdrawing into myself.
See also: withdraw

withdraw into something

to pull back into something. The turtle withdrew into its shell. The mouse withdrew into its hole.
See also: withdraw

withdraw someone from something

 
1. to pull someone out of something physically. She withdrew the child from the water just in time. I had to withdraw my child from the kindergarten room. He was having such a good time, he wouldn't leave on his own.
2. . to remove someone from an organization or a nomination. The committee withdrew John from nomination and put up someone else. I withdrew my son from kindergarten.
See also: withdraw

withdraw something from someone or something

to pull something out of someone or something. She withdrew the book from the stack. I withdrew the splinter from Dave carefully.
See also: withdraw

withdraw something into something

to pull something back into something. The turtle withdrew its head into its shell. It then withdrew its feet into the shell also.
See also: withdraw
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go, retreat, withdraw, etc. into your ˈshell

become more shy and avoid talking to other people: If you ask him about his family, he goes into his shell.
See also: shell
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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Generally, the beneficiary may withdraw fund earnings tax free if the amounts do not exceed the QEEs incurred for that year.
"As prayed for, in view of the Motion to 'Withdraw Complaint' dated 23 March 2019 filed by complainant, the above-entitled complaint is deemed withdrawn," the document read.
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