withdraw

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go into (one's) shell

1. To retreat into one's mind or otherwise isolate oneself so as to avoid undesirable thoughts, situations, or interactions with people. After getting mugged I went into my shell and didn't speak to anyone for nearly a week. I'm not good around large groups of people; I usually just go into my shell and wait until I can be alone. Don't go into your shell because you don't want an argument—talk to me and let's discuss the problem!
2. To act in a reserved and/or defensive manner. The team went into their shells after half time, trying to protect a slim lead. The senator went into his shell when reporters tried to question him about allegations of tax fraud.
See also: go, shell

retreat into (one's) shell

1. To retreat into one's mind or otherwise isolate oneself so as to avoid undesirable thoughts, situations, or interactions with people. After getting mugged I retreated into my shell and didn't speak to anyone for nearly a week. I'm not good around large groups of people. I usually just retreat into my shell and wait until I can be alone. Don't retreat into your shell because you don't want an argument—talk to me and let's discuss the problem!
2. To act in a reserved and/or defensive manner. The team retreated into their shells after halftime, trying to protect a slim lead. The senator retreated into his shell when reporters tried to question him about allegations of tax fraud.
See also: retreat, shell

withdraw into (one's) shell

1. To retreat into one's mind or otherwise isolate oneself so as to avoid undesirable thoughts, situations, or interactions with people. After getting mugged I withdrew into my shell and didn't speak to anyone for nearly a week. I'm not good around large groups of people. I usually just withdraw into my shell and wait until I can be alone. Don't withdraw into your shell because you don't want an argument—talk to me and let's discuss the problem!
2. To act in a reserved and/or defensive manner. The team withdrew into their shells after halftime, trying to protect a slim lead. The senator withdrew into his shell when reporters tried to question him about allegations of tax fraud.
See also: shell, withdraw

withdraw from something

 
1. to depart from something physically. I withdrew from the smoky room and ran to the open window to get some air. I withdrew from the unpleasant-looking cafe and looked for something more to my liking.
2. . to end one's association with someone or something. I decided to withdraw from all my professional organizations. I had to withdraw from the association because the dues had become too high.
See also: withdraw

withdraw into oneself

to become introverted; to concern oneself with one's inner thoughts. After a few years of being ignored, she withdrew into herself. I have to struggle to keep from withdrawing into myself.
See also: withdraw

withdraw into something

to pull back into something. The turtle withdrew into its shell. The mouse withdrew into its hole.
See also: withdraw

withdraw someone from something

 
1. to pull someone out of something physically. She withdrew the child from the water just in time. I had to withdraw my child from the kindergarten room. He was having such a good time, he wouldn't leave on his own.
2. . to remove someone from an organization or a nomination. The committee withdrew John from nomination and put up someone else. I withdrew my son from kindergarten.
See also: withdraw

withdraw something from someone or something

to pull something out of someone or something. She withdrew the book from the stack. I withdrew the splinter from Dave carefully.
See also: withdraw

withdraw something into something

to pull something back into something. The turtle withdrew its head into its shell. It then withdrew its feet into the shell also.
See also: withdraw

go, retreat, withdraw, etc. into your ˈshell

become more shy and avoid talking to other people: If you ask him about his family, he goes into his shell.
See also: shell
References in periodicals archive ?
Gale and Vives (2002) and Allen and Gale (1998) do not assume sequential service, but the optimal contract has a structure similar to the deposit contract in the sense that for high values of R the payoff to early withdrawers is not contingent.
Withdrawers "had significantly higher GPAs and were 40 percent more likely to have a degree in their teaching field than new hires." The majority of those who withdrew cited late hiring as their reason for accepting employment elsewhere.
Previous research has found that only a small proportion of withdrawers tend to be employed (White et al.
Each of the (eventually twelve) associations was separately organized and managed, and each paid its own way by imposing charges on waste dischargers and water withdrawers. Dues from municipalities and industry, based on water usage, covered any shortfalls in revenues from discharge and withdrawal fees.
His aim is to lump all of his adversaries together and place them on the fringes of social and intellectual life, by branding them as the successors of (to use his categories) the "nullifiers," "seceders," "insurrectionists," "vigilantes," "withdrawers," and "disobeyers" who have dotted our history.
Since school officials no longer recorded the number of children withdrawing annually after 1876, it is impossible to know if the number of withdrawers moved downward with the decline in children "at work."
The Diamond-Dybvig bank thus shares with early withdrawers some of the high return from long-term investment in the technology.
"Personality Differences between Persisters and Withdrawers in a Small Women's College." Research in Higher Education, 5 (1976), 15-25.
So the withdrawers burn their bridges to the future, while the academically talented "YY" (her real nickname) and her pals work out their hostilities by throwing darts at the principal's photograph in the privacy of the newspaper office.