with reason


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Related to with reason: it stands to reason

with (good) reason

Having a sound, justifiable cause or purpose; because something has already been proven true or justifiable. Yes, it was I who denied the defendant's application, but with reason—none of his supporting documentation was from within the last six months, as stipulated on our department's website. Officers may only search a person's private belongings or possessions with good reason that can be proven to the courts. Yes, I'm suspicious, but with good reason—I've already caught her twice in the past.
See also: reason
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

with reason

For a ground or cause, justifiably, as in He turned down their offer, but with reason-he didn't want to move his family to a big city . [c. 1600]
See also: reason
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

with reason

With good cause; justifiably.
See also: reason
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
If Gael chooses to cultivate the impartial disposition, he will diminish his future compliance with reasons of partiality regardless of whether those reasons are reasons to benefit or reasons to consider.
The connection with reasons is the first and most widely accepted mark of intentional action, even if there is disagreement about how to spell it out.
Reason states are not to be equated with reasons in Audi's terminology: reasons for Audi are propositions.
I grant that a different reason-concept, one that abandons RR, might play other important theoretical roles, even if it cannot play the roles associated with reasons' peculiar normativity.
It resonates with those who think that at least some of our impulses provide us with reasons to act, but who doubt that the mere having of an impulse or desire, as such, counts in favor of acting.
Schroeder is concerned only with reasons for action here, and so the comparison will be limited but still, hopefully, illustrative.
being valuable is not a property that provides us with reasons. Rather, to call something valuable is to say that it has other properties that provide reasons for behaving in certain ways with regard to it.