wish away

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wish away

To cause some problematic person, issue, or situation to disappear or become resolved simply by desiring it to happen or ignoring that it is a problem at all. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wish" and "away." Look, I know you want to wish away this problem with accounting, but if we don't deal with it now, we could be looking at criminal charges down the line. This generation just tries to wish away the challenges facing the planet by complaining on social media, without actually taking any meaningful action. I know your little brother can be irritating at time, but you can't just wish him away—he's family, and you need to look out for him!
See also: away, wish
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wish someone or something away

to wish that someone or something would go away. You can't just wish him away. You'll have to ask him to leave! Don't try to wish away the difficulties of your life.
See also: away, wish
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wish away

v.
To eliminate some problem by merely desiring or pretending that it did not exist: They tried to wish away the war by gathering support without taking any action. Do you think you can wish your troubles away? Poverty cannot be wished away.
See also: away, wish
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Your uncle, and his brother admirals, perhaps knew little of clergymen beyond the chaplains whom, good or bad, they were always wishing away."
In sections on victory without theory, the journey towards judicial empathy, and the players and their tallies, he considers such aspects as fairness over madness: the congressional response to the Great Depression, "fairness" takes hold: major cases and minor defendants, the prohibition's period of uncertainty, 2001: the full arsenal arrives with the millennium, the Department of Justice: zealous but pointed crusader, and wishing away the oasis.
But what they don't know is - and they won't believe it when you tell them - is that life blinks by, and them wishing away their youth because they want to wear a short skirt or buy their own sofa is just heartbreaking.
Happily wishing away the lives of over 65s so that they can recalculate the referendum result and declare; 'we would win if it were held now'!
He also stated that wishing away Modi factor was a big jolt and also added that the National Conference will look into the details of the defeat and take this as a lesson.
As if you're on this Monday zoom to Friday treadmill wishing away over 50% of our week.
There must be no whitewash and no wishing away of the problem.
'ForGod'ssakegive ther estofusa chance' NickScholfield (pictured)to TonyMcCoy afterthe champion hadwonthe firstfour racesat Newton Abbot ALL SYSTEMS GO DavidLanigan,whowon withMelodramaat Wolverhampton, reported heis"wishing away the nexttwoweeks"as hisMainSequence,12-1 third favourite for the Investec Derby, isinsuch goodform."He'lldoa littlebiton Wednesday andhisfinalseriouspiece ofworkonSaturday-I'm veryhappywithhim," saidtheLambourn trainer.
But that could be about to change with the long-awaited arrival (and I mean 'long' - it feels like Sky's been trailing this for ages now) of a brand new sitcom that could find audiences wishing away the weekend just so Monday nights come that bit quicker.
"I'm learning well now and it's like I'm wishing away my life because I want to box for titles.
He added: "I'm learning well now and it's like I'm wishing away my life because I want to box for titles.
Most blamed peer pressure, but more than half felt that celebrity culture, reality TV shows and teen magazines also played a part in their son or daughter wishing away their childhood.
Perhaps the atheists are wishing away a righteous God?
"Almost done, almost," she says, wishing away the anguish, abuse and ridicule heaped upon her by family and schoolmates in small-town Ohio in 1941.