winnow


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Related to winnow: winnow out

winnow away

1. To use a current of air to blow chaff away from grain. A noun or pronoun can be used between "winnow" and "away." The revolutionary new machine promises to winnow away chaff much faster with a lower percentage of grain being lost or destroyed in the process. Before they had mechanical means, farmers had to rely on the wind to winnow chaff and other debris away.
2. To filter out and remove persons or things that are unfit, unwanted, or unreliable. A noun or pronoun can be used between "winnow" and "away." The grueling nature of these exams in meant to test the learning of up-and-coming doctors, as well as winnow away those who don't have the determination and resilience. The committee will first winnow the weakest applicants away before beginning to seriously examine those who might be accepted into the university. We'll subject your thesis to a panel of professors in order to winnow away any problems with logic or evidence.
3. To cause a group to become smaller by removing the least able or desirable people or things from it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "winnow" and "away." The company always takes on a large number of interns each summer, winnowing it away until only the most capable remain to be given work full time. Natural selection winnows out the population of animals, leaving behind those with the traits necessary to withstand the environment and its predators.
See also: away, winnow

winnow from (something)

1. To use a current of wind or air to separate grain from chaff. A noun or pronoun, especially "grain," is used between "winnow" and "from." The revolutionary new machine promises to winnow grain from chaff much more efficiently. Before they had mechanical means, farmers had to rely on the wind to winnow chaff and other debris away.
2. To select the most capable, desirable, or viable persons or things from a group, discarding the rest. A noun or pronoun is used between "winnow" and "from." The grueling nature of these exams in meant to winnow the best or most serious medical students from those who don't have what it takes to succeed. The committee will winnow the strongest applications from weakest.
See also: winnow

winnow out

1. To use a current of air to blow chaff away from grain. A noun or pronoun can be used between "winnow" and "out." The revolutionary new machine promises to winnow out chaff much faster with a lower percentage of grain being lost or destroyed in the process. Before they had mechanical means, farmers had to rely on the wind to winnow chaff and other debris out.
2. To filter out and remove persons or things that are unfit, unwanted, or unreliable. A noun or pronoun can be used between "winnow" and "out." The grueling nature of these exams in meant to test the learning of up-and-coming doctors, as well as winnow out those who don't have the determination and resilience. The committee will first winnow the weakest applicants out before beginning to seriously examine those who might be accepted into the university. We'll subject your thesis to a panel of professors in order to winnow out any problems with logic or evidence.
3. To select the most capable, desirable, or viable persons or things from a group, discarding the rest. A noun or pronoun can used between "winnow" and "out." Our application process already brings in the brightest the country has to offer, so our interview process has to winnow out the very best of the best. A good editor can winnow out the best parts of a manuscript while discarding or reshaping what doesn't work as well.
4. To cause a group to become smaller by removing the least able or desirable people or things from it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "winnow" and "out." The company always takes on a large number of interns each summer, winnowing it out until only the most capable remain to be given work full time. Natural selection winnows out the population of animals, leaving behind those with the traits necessary to withstand the environment and its predators.
See also: out, winnow

winnow away

v.
1. To remove some material, such as chaff, from grain by means of a current of air: Modern machines can winnow away all the chaff very efficiently. The farmers winnow the chaff away by flinging the grain into the air with a large blanket.
2. To get rid of some unfit or undesirable part; eliminate something or someone: The process will winnow away the weakest candidates. The editor winnowed most of the errors away.
3. To reduce some group by separating or eliminating the unfit or undesirable part: The process winnowed away the field of candidates.
4. To remove some material from a mixture by means of a current of air or water: The wind has winnowed away the sand from the soil. Water currents pick up mud from the riverbank and winnow it away, exposing the rock.
See also: away, winnow

winnow out

v.
1. To separate some material, such as chaff, from grain by means of a current of air: The farmer winnows out the chaff with a machine. There is always some debris in the harvest, but we winnow it out.
2. To separate or get rid of some unfit or undesirable part; eliminate something or someone: The lions tend to winnow out the sick antelope. The political process will winnow the weakest candidates out.
3. To sort or select some fit or desirable part; extract someone or something: We winnowed out the top candidates from the rest and interviewed them. There are only a few good pieces of wood in this shipment, and it will take a long time to winnow them out.
4. To rid some group of unfit or undesirable members: The test winnowed out the applicant pool.
See also: out, winnow
References in periodicals archive ?
Winnow to make painful compromises, the health care team must also be willing to make uncomfortable concessions.
Winnow a burn victim, it would be easier to make the case that her "screams, cries, and pleas to let her die" will, in the foreseeable future, be replaced with sighs of relief that the worst part of the road to recovery has been traveled.
Winnow from having to be admitted to a skilled nursing facility at the age of forty-five?
Winnow became an official ethics problem only when she refused treatment in a hospital environment.
Winnow as in the past, but hope that one of her organs starts to fail so that she can refuse treatment for the failing organ.
Winnow with enough barbiturates to render her unconscious and unable to eat or drink--may be the last resort, but only if she truly consents to sleeping through her final days; and, I suspect, only if her caregivers convince themselves that "heavy sedation" (sometimes referred to as "terminal sedation") is within the confines of accepted ethics, and that relieving suffering and easing death sometimes become one.
Winnow is "living," for year after year, is frightful.
Winnows refusal would mean that nurses would assault the patient "for her own good" through screams of pain-cold comfort for both patient and nurse.
CBS will accept applications for the show through April 13 and winnow the group to 800 people who will be invited to come in for auditions at their own expense.
Thursday, July 15 at Winnows Hill, Blanchland, DH8 9PQ.
Then you set separate vocabulary levels for both of you, which winnows down the fare to perhaps a few dozen sites.
While one could hardly characterize coal as a sexy mineral, as deregulation of the utilities looms larger and consolidation among the big coal producers winnows the number of players down to a manageable five or six, coal may be getting sexier as an investment.
Sur's youthful enthusiasm constantly creates elaborate routines; Roca's stabilizing sense of realism winnows out the impractical.