winning


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win (something) in a walk

To win (something) easily, handily, or without much or any effort. Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk.
See also: walk, win

winning ways

One's charming, endearing, or likeable personality or demeanor. It wasn't hard for me to spot Kelly's winning ways immediately—she has been bubbly and upbeat since the moment we met.
See also: way, winning

win one for the Gipper

To do something in honor of someone else. This set phrase refers to celebrated Notre Dame football player George Gipp ("the Gipper"). Several years after Gipp's death at age 25, Notre Dame coach Knute Rockne urged his team to "win one for the Gipper." Let's work hard to meet the last sales goal before Jim retires—let's win one for the Gipper!
See also: Gipper, one, win

winning!

A jubilant exclamation that can be spoken, written, or used as a hashtag. It is often used to humorously highlight minor successes but can be used ironically to point out failures. The baby slept for five hours straight last night—winning! Winning: when the boss doesn't see you slip into your office 10 minutes late. Spilled coffee all over myself this morning! #winning

win (something) hands down

To win something easily or decisively. We were really unprepared for our last game, and the other team won hands down.
See also: down, hand, win

win the day

To be successful. It sounds like your presentation to the committee won the day—well done.
See also: win

win out

To defeat someone or something; to prevail. We had a vote, and this is the yearbook cover that won out.
See also: out, win

win the wooden spoon

To finish a contest or competition in last place. (The "wooden spoon" is the hypothetical prize for the person finishing in last place in a competition.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I don't expect to win, but I sure hope I don't win the wooden spoon!
See also: spoon, win, wooden

winning isn't everything

A phrase downplaying the importance of winning, often as an attempt at consolation after losing some competition. I know you're bummed out about losing the big game, but winning isn't everything. After all, you played really well, even though your team didn't win. When you think of how many top professional athletes have had trouble with the law or have struggled with debt, it's a powerful reminder that winning isn't everything.
See also: everything, winning

(something) isn't everything

A phrase downplaying the importance of something, often as an attempt at consolation when someone doesn't achieve it. Most commonly used in reference to money or winning. I know you're bummed out about losing the big game, but winning isn't everything. After all, you played really well, even though your team didn't win. When you think of how many celebrities have had trouble with the law or have struggled with substance abuse, it's a powerful reminder that money isn't everything.
See also: everything

win (something) by a hair

To succeed or defeat someone in something by only a very narrow margin. Making huge gains during the final lap, the underdog rookie managed to overtake the reigning champion and win the race by a hair. We only won by a hair, but at least we got the conviction we were looking for.
See also: hair, win

win (something) by a nose

To succeed or defeat someone in something by only a very narrow margin. Making huge gains during the final lap, the underdog rookie managed to overtake the reigning champion and win the race by a nose. We only won by a nose, but at least we got the conviction we were looking for.
See also: nose, win

win (something) by a whisker

To succeed or defeat someone in something by only a very narrow margin. Making huge gains during the final lap, the underdog rookie managed to overtake the reigning champion and win the race by a whisker. We only won by a whisker, but at least we got the conviction we were looking for.
See also: whisker, win

win (something) by a neck

To succeed or defeat someone in something by only a very narrow margin. Making huge gains during the final lap, the underdog rookie managed to overtake the reigning champion and win the race by a neck. We only won by a neck, but at least we got the conviction we were looking for.
See also: neck, win

win or lose

Regardless of being successful or not. You're honor is at stake here as well, so you have to put up a good fight in court, win or lose. Win or lose, no one can say our company didn't have an impact on the industry at large.
See also: lose, win

win (one's) heart

To gain the love, affection, or admiration of someone. Can also be structured "win the heart of (someone)." She wasn't too impressed with me when I first met her, but I managed to win her heart by opening up to her about my aspirations as an artist. The rising star has already won the hearts of fans across the country, as her career continues its meteoric rise.
See also: heart, win

win the battle, but lose the war

To achieve a minor success or victory, but lose or fail to achieve a larger, more important, or overarching goal, especially when that larger failure is at least partly due to the smaller victory. The phrase is often split into two halves across different parts of a sentence to achieve its meaning. The government has won the battle against corporate tax evasions, but it's losing the war, because many companies have started relocating in other countries. They may have won the battle for possession of the ball, but if they can't translate that into touchdowns, they'll lose the war.
See also: but, lose, war, win

lose the battle, but win the war

To suffer a minor defeat or failure, but achieve a larger, more important, or overarching success or victory over time. The phrase is often split into two halves across different parts of a sentence to achieve its meaning. We may have lost the battle for now against this unjust law, but we're confident that we will win the war when it comes before the Supreme Court next month. By forcing the enemy to expend so many troops and resources, they'll be too depleted to defend our other avenues of attack, so while we lost this battle, we'll now be able to win the war.
See also: but, lose, war, win

win ugly

To achieve victory after putting in a lot of effort and unglamorous technique and enduring many hardships or overcoming many obstacles. (As opposed to winning with ease, grace, or style.) After falling behind by 12 points early on, the heavyweight grappler had to claw his way back to a last-second victory. "I won ugly, but a win is a win," he said after the match.
See also: ugly, win

winning streak

A series of consecutive successes, a run of good luck, as in Our son-in-law has been on a winning streak with his investments. This expression comes from gambling. [Mid-1900s]
See also: streak, winning

win out

Succeed, prevail, as in She was sure she'd win out if she persisted. [Late 1800s]
See also: out, win

win the battle, but lose the war

If you win the battle, but lose the war, you achieve a small thing but in achieving that, lose or fail to get something which is more important. The strikers may have won the battle, but they lost the war. Note: You can also say that you lose the battle, but win the war, meaning the opposite. Betty Hyde may have lost the battle, but she won the war and took her business to another bank.
See also: but, lose, war, win

win the wooden spoon

be the least successful contestant; win the booby prize.
A wooden spoon was originally presented to the candidate coming last in the Cambridge University mathematical tripos (the final honours examination for a BA degree).
See also: spoon, win, wooden

win ugly

gain victory through solid application and hard work rather than elegantly and with apparent effortlessness.
The phrase gained popularity as the title of the book Winning Ugly: Mental Warfare in Tennis ( 1993 ) by the Australian tennis coach Brad Gilbert and Steve Jamison .
2005 Croydon Guardian Manager Bob Langford said he was happy to ‘win ugly’ to ensure Ryman Division One safety.
See also: ugly, win

money, winning, etc. isn’t ˈeverything

money, etc. is not the most important thing: Work isn’t everything. You must learn to relax a bit more.
See also: everything

ˌwin or ˈlose

whether you succeed or fail: Win or lose, we’ll know we’ve done our best.
See also: lose, win

win out

v.
To succeed or prevail: After a two-year battle in the courts, she eventually won out.
See also: out, win

win the day

To be successful.
See also: win
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Even though Phipps can race conservatively and still win the track championship, he wants to end his season on a winning note.
Hosting the event will be Dale Groff, area manager, Sun Company; Prince Aweda, Sunoco A-Plus manager for the Media location and employee Abe Ololade, who sold Joseph his winning CASH 5 ticket.
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If Greeley's Galaxy repeats his Illinois Derby victory, Stute will be the Kentucky Derby's oldest winning trainer.
Doubles partners Alison Wagner and Michelle Sulahian continued their dominant play, winning 6-0, 6-0, 6-1 to bring their set record to 38-1 for the year.
In Game 1, when any of Your Numbers match either of the Winning Numbers, you win the prize shown under the matching number.