winning


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win (something) in a walk

To win (something) easily, handily, or without much or any effort. Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a walk.
See also: walk, win

winning ways

One's charming, endearing, or likeable personality or demeanor. It wasn't hard for me to spot Kelly's winning ways immediately—she has been bubbly and upbeat since the moment we met.
See also: way, winning

win one for the Gipper

To do something in honor of someone else. This set phrase refers to celebrated Notre Dame football player George Gipp ("the Gipper"). Several years after Gipp's death at age 25, Notre Dame coach Knute Rockne urged his team to "win one for the Gipper." Let's work hard to meet the last sales goal before Jim retires—let's win one for the Gipper!
See also: Gipper, one, win

winning!

A jubilant exclamation that can be spoken, written, or used as a hashtag. It is often used to humorously highlight minor successes but can be used ironically to point out failures. The baby slept for five hours straight last night—winning! Winning: when the boss doesn't see you slip into your office 10 minutes late. Spilled coffee all over myself this morning! #winning

win (something) hands down

To win something easily or decisively. We were really unprepared for our last game, and the other team won hands down.
See also: down, hand, win

win the day

To be successful. It sounds like your presentation to the committee won the day—well done.
See also: win

win out

To defeat someone or something; to prevail. We had a vote, and this is the yearbook cover that won out.
See also: out, win

win the wooden spoon

To finish a contest or competition in last place. (The "wooden spoon" is the hypothetical prize for the person finishing in last place in a competition.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I don't expect to win, but I sure hope I don't win the wooden spoon!
See also: spoon, win, wooden

winning isn't everything

A phrase downplaying the importance of winning, often as an attempt at consolation when someone has lost some competition. I know you're bummed out about losing the big game, but winning isn't everything. After all, you played really well, even though your team didn't win. When you think of how many top professional athletes have had trouble with the law or have struggled with debt, it's a powerful reminder that winning isn't everything.
See also: everything, winning

(something) isn't everything

A phrase downplaying the importance of something, often as an attempt at consolation when someone doesn't achieve it. Most commonly used in reference to money or winning. I know you're bummed out about losing the big game, but winning isn't everything. After all, you played really well, even though your team didn't win. When you think of how many celebrities have had trouble with the law or have struggled with substance abuse, it's a powerful reminder that money isn't everything.
See also: everything

win (something) by a hair

To succeed or defeat someone in something by only a very narrow margin. Making huge gains during the final lap, the underdog rookie managed to overtake the reigning champion and win the race by a hair. We only won by a hair, but at least we got the conviction we were looking for.
See also: by, hair, win

win (something) by a nose

To succeed or defeat someone in something by only a very narrow margin. Making huge gains during the final lap, the underdog rookie managed to overtake the reigning champion and win the race by a nose. We only won by a nose, but at least we got the conviction we were looking for.
See also: by, nose, win

win (something) by a whisker

To succeed or defeat someone in something by only a very narrow margin. Making huge gains during the final lap, the underdog rookie managed to overtake the reigning champion and win the race by a whisker. We only won by a whisker, but at least we got the conviction we were looking for.
See also: by, whisker, win

win (something) by a neck

To succeed or defeat someone in something by only a very narrow margin. Making huge gains during the final lap, the underdog rookie managed to overtake the reigning champion and win the race by a neck. We only won by a neck, but at least we got the conviction we were looking for.
See also: by, neck, win

win or lose

Regardless of being successful or not. You're honor is at stake here as well, so you have to put up a good fight in court, win or lose. Win or lose, no one can say our company didn't have an impact on the industry at large.
See also: lose, win

win (one's) heart

To gain the love, affection, or admiration of someone. Can also be structured as "win the heart of (someone)." She wasn't too impressed with me when I first met her, but I managed to win her heart by opening up to her about my aspirations as an artist. The rising star has already won the hearts of fans across the country, as her career continues its meteoric rise.
See also: heart, win

win the battle, but lose the war

To achieve a minor success or victory, but lose or fail to achieve a larger, more important, or overarching goal, especially when that larger failure is at least partly due to the smaller victory. The phrase is often split into two halves across different parts of a sentence to achieve its meaning. The government has won the battle against corporate tax evasions, but it's losing the war, because many companies have started relocating in other countries. They may have won the battle for possession of the ball, but if they can't translate that into touchdowns, they'll lose the war.
See also: but, lose, war, win

lose the battle, but win the war

To suffer a minor defeat or failure, but achieve a larger, more important, or overarching success or victory over time. The phrase is often split into two halves across different parts of a sentence to achieve its meaning. We may have lost the battle for now against this unjust law, but we're confident that we will win the war when it comes before the Supreme Court next month. By forcing the enemy to expend so many troops and resources, they'll be too depleted to defend our other avenues of attack, so while we lost this battle, we'll now be able to win the war.
See also: but, lose, war, win

win ugly

To achieve victory after putting in a lot of effort and unglamorous technique and enduring many hardships or overcoming many obstacles. (As opposed to winning with ease, grace, or style.) After falling behind by 12 points early on, the heavyweight grappler had to claw his way back to a last-second victory. "I won ugly, but a win is a win," he said after the match.
See also: ugly, win

win at

1. To be victorious in some competitive event or activity. I don't normally win at debates like these, but I felt really confident and well prepared. My parents always let us win at board games when we were really little.
2. To earn some kind of prize or reward at a competitive event or activity. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "win" and "at." I won a stuffed bear at the target-shooting game at the state fair. He won a nice little sum of money at the national spelling bee.
See also: win

win back

To re-earn or regain someone or something through a new, successful competitive effort. A noun or pronoun is used between "win" and "back." The team is hoping to win back their championship title next week. He vowed to do whatever it takes to win his ex-wife back.
See also: back, win

win on points

To succeed or achieve victory through a series of technicalities or minor gains, rather than true dominance or skill. A noun or pronoun can be used between "win" and "on points" to specify what was won. Everyone seems pretty evenly split on which candidate won the debate, though most outlets agree that Senator Thompson won on points due to having clearer, more focused answers. The defense, though clearly having the weaker position overall, won the case on points because several key pieces of evidence were thrown out by the judge.
See also: on, point, win

win through

1. To be victorious; to achieve success. I was confident from the very beginning that our team would win through. It turns out our department won through in terms of overall sales, which is pretty cool to hear.
2. To be victorious or achieve success because of some specific factor or by some particular method. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "win" and "through." If you have to win through cheating, then you haven't really won anything at all. Though they were considered underdogs, their team won the championship through sheer hard work and determination.
See also: through, win

winning streak

A consecutive series of victories, successes, or instances of good fortune. The team, considered the least likely of the entire league to make it to the playoffs, has continued its remarkable winning streak for the 14th straight game. We've finally started having a bit of a winning streak with our latest products. Caught up in an unbelievable winning streak, I started making riskier and riskier bets, until I ended up losing everything in a single game of cards.
See also: streak, winning

win at something

to triumph at some competition. Will I ever be able to win at golf? She always wins at poker.
See also: win

win someone or something back (from someone or something)

to regain someone or something from someone or something. I hope to win the money I lost back from the other poker players. We were not able to win Sally back from the cult. We won back everything. We won back Sally.
See also: back, win

win something at something

to win a prize in some sort of competition. I won this silly doll at the ring-toss game. Did you win anything at the fair?
See also: win

win through something

to succeed by a certain method or procedure. Winning is no good if you have to win through dishonesty. Sally won through her own hard work.
See also: through, win

winning streak

A series of consecutive successes, a run of good luck, as in Our son-in-law has been on a winning streak with his investments. This expression comes from gambling. [Mid-1900s]
See also: streak, winning

win on points

Succeed but barely, especially by a technicality. For example, Both sides were forceful in that argument about the embargo, but I think the senator won on points . This term comes from boxing, where in the absence of a knockout the winner is decided on the basis of points awarded for each round. Its figurative use dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: on, point, win

win out

Succeed, prevail, as in She was sure she'd win out if she persisted. [Late 1800s]
See also: out, win

win through

Also, win the day. End successfully, be victorious, as in We didn't know until the very end if they would win through, or It seems that hard work won the day. The first term dates from the late 1800s and today is more often put as come through (def. 1). The variant originally alluded to the outcome of a battle and dates from the late 1500s.
See also: through, win

win the battle, but lose the war

If you win the battle, but lose the war, you achieve a small thing but in achieving that, lose or fail to get something which is more important. The strikers may have won the battle, but they lost the war. Note: You can also say that you lose the battle, but win the war, meaning the opposite. Betty Hyde may have lost the battle, but she won the war and took her business to another bank.
See also: but, lose, war, win

win on points

win by accumulating a series of minor gains rather than by a single dramatic feat.
In boxing, a fighter wins on points by having the referee and judges award him more points than his opponent, rather than by a knockout.
See also: on, point, win

win the wooden spoon

be the least successful contestant; win the booby prize.
A wooden spoon was originally presented to the candidate coming last in the Cambridge University mathematical tripos (the final honours examination for a BA degree).
See also: spoon, win, wooden

win ugly

gain victory through solid application and hard work rather than elegantly and with apparent effortlessness.
The phrase gained popularity as the title of the book Winning Ugly: Mental Warfare in Tennis ( 1993 ) by the Australian tennis coach Brad Gilbert and Steve Jamison .
2005 Croydon Guardian Manager Bob Langford said he was happy to ‘win ugly’ to ensure Ryman Division One safety.
See also: ugly, win

money, winning, etc. isn’t ˈeverything

money, etc. is not the most important thing: Work isn’t everything. You must learn to relax a bit more.
See also: everything

ˌwin or ˈlose

whether you succeed or fail: Win or lose, we’ll know we’ve done our best.
See also: lose, win

win at

v.
To achieve victory in some activity or event: I usually win at chess. I used to be good at poker, but now I can't win at any card games at all.
See also: win

win back

v.
To regain, through effort or contest, something or someone that one has lost or no longer has: My friend is at the casino, trying to win back what he lost last night. Her boyfriend left her, but she's sure she will win him back.
See also: back, win

win out

v.
To succeed or prevail: After a two-year battle in the courts, she eventually won out.
See also: out, win

win through

v.
Chiefly British To overcome difficulties and attain a desired goal or end: The soccer team won through to the finals.
See also: through, win

win the day

To be successful.
See also: win
References in periodicals archive ?
Matthew Mastaglio was player of the match for the Knights, winning his three games.
Oakland's Sam Arts had a big day, winning four events: the 110 hurdles (17.03), 300 hurdles (42.14), pole vault (12-0) and triple jump (41-63/4).
A number of new players lined up in the B teams with Teesside the more dominant team again but had a shock in the first set with Cleveland winning the first two frames through Ian Corns and Amy Thomas.
Just down the road at Sandown is a 5f nursery from July 20 won by Mister Musicmaster (No.17) who, since winning a better event, flagged up the chances of the runner-up, Sister Guru, and third, Kyllasie.
So, there must always be a winning move for the first player.
When our February poll asked Democrats whether they thought if nominated, Hillary Clinton would have as good a chance as any other Democratic nominee of winning the general election, or if they worried that she could not win a general election, 47 percent said her chances were as good as any Democrat, but 46 percent worried that she could not win a general election.
Under then-existing NYSL rules, A did not receive his entire winnings in 1989; rather, he received the right to approximately $1.2 million per year for 20 years.
Recorded six undefeated seasons and two 27-game winning streaks.
Winning Wimbledon was akin to winning the White House as far as many black Americans were concerned.
WINNING TRAITS: An acute sense of hearing, night vision, sharp spines, and the ability to swim and fly make the swaigerhog almost invincible to predators.
Welsh League 16 matches - Three points for a win Potential total - 48 pointsCeltic League Qualifying from group stage - 3 points Winning quarter-final - 3 points Winning semi-final - 3 points Winning final - 3 points Potential total - 12 points
She remarks, "The demand of winning pushes teachers to think of something new, so the steps are constantly evolving.
Candidates would no longer have to worry about winning each state.
James Bradbury won his three games for the Cramlington team with Nigel Rodgers and Steve Pearce winning one game each.
Elmira's Zane Wardwell won the shot put with a toss of 47-0 to add to his discus title from Thursday, and Sweet Home's Jakob Hiett took his second individual title, winning the 1,500 in 4:10.42.