winged


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Related to winged: winged scapula

wing (one's)/its way

1. To fly along some course or toward some destination, especially very quickly. If it's dark enough, you can see satellites winging their way around the planet. It is the only aircraft to wing its way across the Atlantic in less than three hours.
2. To approach or travel to someone, something, or some place. I can't believe we'll be winging our way to Las Vegas in just under a month! The band plans to tour all across the United States, then wing its way to Europe in the summer.
See also: way, wing

wing it

To do or attempt something with little preparation in advance; to improvise. Oh man, I totally forgot that I'm supposed to do this presentation today—I'll just have to wing it.
See also: wing

winged words

Very eloquent, meaningful, and impactful speech. In his address before congress, the president spoke with winged words about the need for the country to unite in its fight against tyranny and evil.
See also: winged, word
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wing it

to improvise; to do something extemporaneously. I lost my lecture notes, so I had to wing it. Don't worry. Just go out there and wing it.
See also: wing
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wing it

Improvise, as in The interviewer had not read the author's book; he was just winging it. This expression comes from the theater, where it alludes to an actor studying his part in the wings (the areas to either side of the stage) because he has been suddenly called on to replace another. First recorded in 1885, it eventually was extended to other kinds of improvisation based on unpreparedness.
See also: wing
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

winged words

highly significant or apposite words. literary
The image, taken from Homer 's Iliad, is of the words travelling as directly as arrows to their intended target.
See also: winged, word
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˈwing it

(informal) do something without planning or preparing it first; improvise: I didn’t know I’d have to make a speech — I just had to wing it.
See also: wing
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wing it

tv. to improvise; to do something extemporaneously. Don’t worry. Just go out there and wing it.
See also: wing
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

wing it

Informal
To improvise: I hadn't prepared for the interview, so I had to wing it.
See also: wing
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"We found that the simple up and down wavelike stroke of wings at the resonance frequency is easier to implement and generates lift comparable to winged insects that employ a significantly more complex stroke," said Alexander Alexeev.
A former hay ranch, the preserve plants cover crops as a food source for its birds and as a sanctuary from four-legged and winged predators.
The Adams is probably the best-known example, but a wide variety of patterns can be winged in this style, and many tiers now substitute feather tips on flies that traditionally called for the more fragile quill wings.
The project involved an injection molded PVC winged inserter used in a new catheter product.
More than 99.9 percent of the 900,000 species of insects on Earth are classified as Pterygota, or winged insects.
New analyses of a fossil ignored for decades in a British museum suggest that winged insects may have emerged as early as 400 million years ago, tens of millions of years before scientists expected.