wine, women, and song

wine, women, and song

Hedonistic pleasures and vices, specifically drinking alcohol, having or pursuing sex with women, and seeking general entertainment like singing or dancing. Usually said of and by men. The year after I finished my bachelor degree (and finally had a bit of spare cash and spare time to spend) was mostly just a haze of wine, women, and song. When asked what was the secret to being a successful writer, he responded dryly, "Wine, women and song."
See also: and, song

wine, women, and song

the hedonistic life of drinking, sexual pleasure, and carefree entertainment proverbially required by men.
See also: and, song

wine, women, and song

The good life, in a dissolute fashion. The precise locution first appeared in German and in the late eighteenth century was translated (and attributed to Martin Luther, without real authority). “Who loves not women, wine, and song, remains a fool his whole life long,” it went, and in 1862 Thackeray (Adventures of Philip) prefaced it with, “Then sing, as Martin Luther sang, as Doctor Martin Luther sang.” Johann Strauss the Younger (1825–99) used it as the title of one of his famous waltzes (opus 333).
See also: and, song
References in periodicals archive ?
I think It's sanctifying God's gifted charm Of wine, women, and song to a Sephardic Jew.
His youthful zeal is also expressed in unabashed eroticism and in the exultation of wine, women, and song. More importantly, he was the first to write poetry in the simple language of the common people.
There are two errors that we can fall into: we can focus on the fast to the exclusion of Lent, and thus ally ourselves with all the puritans who deny the fundamental goodness of all that God has created, including wine, women, and song, or we can so be taken up with the hedonistic pursuit of created good as to forget the Giver of those gifts and His intention in giving them to us.
Many of the works were translated by John Addington Symonds as Wine, Women, and Song (1884).
Symonds translated in his Wine, Women, and Song (1884).