windy

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windy

1. informal Unsubstantial; empty or hollow. There are many a windy promise made during political campaigns. There has been a lot of windy talk being bandied about lately regarding the supposed benefits of "carb-free" diets.
2. informal Given to or characterized by prolonged, verbose talk, especially that which is inane or wearisome. Yet another windy academic who could talk for hours about the crisis without offering any real solutions. I can't stand the pompous, windy buffoons my father invites to dinner.
3. informal Having or expelling an excessive amount of digestive gas; flatulent. The Brussels sprouts made several of the dinner guests rather windy, much to their embarrassment. I like the taste of beer, but it makes me really windy the next day.
4. slang Nervous, skittish, or easily frightened. After the war, the mere sight of a rifle was enough to make Daniel start feeling windy. I wouldn't call her windy, per se—overly cautious, perhaps.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

windy

1. mod. talkative. She’s so windy! Won’t she ever let up?
2. mod. flatulent; having intestinal gas. If you’re windy, why don’t you take the day off? Do us all a favor.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The term is used rather windily to describe a host of quite different practices and activities, ranging from simple document management to business intelligence gathering to complex efforts to create "learning organizations." In some companies, knowledge management is led by the Information Technologies (IT) unit; in others the impetus comes from specific business units such as sales and marketing.
Such a score could help guide jaded audiences to an Ayckbourn who depicts the seaminess of modern life rather than windily expatiating about it - or better yet, to a Shaw who clothes his indignation about capitalism in complexity by making its representatives charming and likeable, though the consequences of their actions are horrifying.
Bonney's coolly efficient staging and Neil Patel's sleek modular design of sliding panels to create a series of chic, soulless spaces also have a tired, seen-it-before feel, notably from the director's recent productions of Neff LaBute's "Fat Pig" and "Some Girl(s)." Those plays all had their flaws, but Ball's windily titled work makes them seem almost profound in retrospect.
Big women sucked copiously on their cigarettes, leaving smears of lipstick on the discarded tips, as they limped along the shingles, leaning on each other's shoulders and giggling windily about the prospects of finding a good man for the night.
Offering up a typical chunk of Tolan's dialogue, Ben counters, "I do miss you, Maureen, and the mud, the silt, the squall and squander and decay that was our life." Indeed, the plot's improbabilities are matched by writing that huffs and puffs its way toward profundity through long, clause-clotted monologues in which epiphanies are recalled, confessions of despair are offered, opinions on Proust and various other cultural topics are windily proclaimed.
Chancing upon a Bible, Adam begins to teach Jacie to read, and she's barely a sentence or two in before "longing to know what happens next." The same question isn't all that deftly answered by the dramatist, who winds the play down as windily as he cranks it up: "Potential" would achieve even more if it were a good 20 minutes shorter.