wind through (something or some place)

wind through (something or some place)

1. Of a path, trail, road, etc., to stretch from one side of something and out another in a twisting or circuitous manner. There is a single trail winding through the treacherous mountains, but it becomes impassable during the winter. We followed a series of smaller side roads that wound through the Great Plains.
2. Of a path, trail, road, etc., to stretch among or between something in a twisting or circuitous manner. The path winds through the massive redwoods, giving visitors ample opportunity to appreciate their splendor. The kids' constant comings and goings created a makeshift footpath that wound through the tall grass behind their house.
3. To move or progress from one side of something and out another in a twisting or circuitous manner. We wound through the forest for several hours before we finally found our way back to the road. You'll have to wind your way through the marsh to reach the cabin.
4. To move or progress among or between something in a twisting or circuitous manner. I don't know how the waiters wind through the tables of people so quickly without spilling anything. The bike courier wound her way through the cars on the streets to deliver her package.
See also: through, wind
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wind through something

[for a pathway] to twist or turn through an area. The trail wound through the jungle, avoiding the densest places. A path wound through the woods, leading us to the main road.
See also: through, wind
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also: