win some, lose some, (you)

win some, lose some

In life, you will always succeed in some situations and fail in others. Used especially as consolation following some loss or failure. A: "I'm so sorry to hear about the game last night." B: "Eh, win some, lose some. We'll just do our best and hopefully win next week." We had to shut the business down this week, but it has always been win some, lose some in this industry.
See also: lose, win
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

win some, lose some, (you)

Accept that some ventures end in victory and others in defeat. This philosophical phrase of acceptance has numerous ancestors with the same meaning—if I lose on the swings I’ll get back on the roundabouts was a common version in early twentieth-century Britain—but the current cliché dates only from about 1920 or so. It probably originated in gambling, possibly in betting on sports events. The London Times used it in 1976: “On the other hand, you . . . got your way over Mrs. Thatcher’s nominee . . . you win some, you lose some.” In July 1990, Time reported, “For a man facing the possibility of 20 years behind bars, John Mulheren was remarkably philosophical. ‘You win some, you lose some,’ said the fallen Wall Street arbitrager last week after a Manhattan jury found him guilty on four felony counts.” See also you can't win them all.
See also: lose, win
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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