will to

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will to

1. To attempt to cause something to happen or someone to do something from the sheer power of one's thoughts, determination, or desire. A noun or pronoun is used between "will" and "to." He seems to be trying to will the population as a whole to accept electric cars as the new default. Lacking the means to effect any meaningful change ourselves, we've all been willing the upper management to reconsider the move, knowing that it will harm our jobs in the long run. I sat watching him read my proposal, willing him to say yes.
2. To bequeath something to someone in one's will. A noun or pronoun is used between "will" and "to." I was as shocked as everyone else to find out that my grandfather had willed the entire estate to me. We all thought it was a joke, but Mrs. Thompson had in fact willed all her possessions to her cats.
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will something to someone

to give something to someone in a will. My uncle willed this chair to me. It's an antique. This watch was willed to me by my grandfather.
See also: will

will to

v.
To grant something to someone in a legal will: My grandfather willed all of his land to me.
See also: will
References in periodicals archive ?
AFTER so much trauma, we're willing something to go smoothly.
There's been so much trauma over the last few days, we're willing something to go smoothly.
"Here at Sunderland the supporters are fanatical and are just willing something to happen.
Second, willing something to be done doesn't make it happen--your desk is clean because mine is cluttered.
Willing something to happen is more fun than willing it not to happen.
After half an hour of willing something to happen (the Devil drop in, a flaming trident to zip across the screen) I really didn't care.
"You don't think the goal is coming and, if it doesn't come, you're willing something to go in.