will to

will to

1. To attempt to cause something to happen or someone to do something from the sheer power of one's thoughts, determination, or desire. A noun or pronoun is used between "will" and "to." He seems to be trying to will the population as a whole to accept electric cars as the new default. Lacking the means to effect any meaningful change ourselves, we've all been willing the upper management to reconsider the move, knowing that it will harm our jobs in the long run. I sat watching him read my proposal, willing him to say yes.
2. To bequeath something to someone in one's will. A noun or pronoun is used between "will" and "to." I was as shocked as everyone else to find out that my grandfather had willed the entire estate to me. We all thought it was a joke, but Mrs. Thompson had in fact willed all her possessions to her cats.
See also: will

will something to someone

to give something to someone in a will. My uncle willed this chair to me. It's an antique. This watch was willed to me by my grandfather.
See also: will

will to

v.
To grant something to someone in a legal will: My grandfather willed all of his land to me.
See also: will
References in periodicals archive ?
These numbers highlight the increasing importance residents and people investing in Dubai place on having a will to plan succession as they see fit.
(55) His Lordship expressly rejected civilian authority cited to him which suggested that either party might make 'a secret will to disappoint the joint disposition'.
"This would oblige all solicitors who draw up a will to lodge its contents - in confidence - within 21 days with a State Office with statutory powers."
A reciprocal declaration is likely to restrict the contents of a will to the issues that seem necessary for an arrangement between the persons involved, i.e.
One patient with Alzheimer's disease used a living will to tell her New York City nursing home that she did not want any artificial nutrition or hydration while she died.
(225) The Court held the will to be a mutual will simply on the basis of its terms (which conferred only a life interest to the surviving testator).