wild

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wild

informal Intensely eager or enthusiastic (about something). I'm just wild about your new outfit, Jen! The kids are all going wild for some new video game called "Short Night."
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wild

mod. exciting; eccentric; cool. Things are really wild here.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These themes are Thoreau's dedication to living a disciplined philosophical life, the value of wildness and an ethos that results from valuing it, and Thoreau's Socratic demand for authentically investigating the problems of life.
Coyote sightings where I live are unpredictable--a delightful surprise and a wonderful sign of wildness in our neighborhood.
As a result, he conveys a strong sense of the cultural weight that ideas about "wildness" have placed on the back of the West, a burden that the region continues to bear as Americans commodify Indians, "Disneyfy" the frontier, and "Ralph Laurenize" its range lands (311, 323).
Their wildness is emblematic of a Narnia that's been freed from" the oppressive "domestication" of Man--which, in Narnia as in our own world, leaves no room for the natural and unrestrained.
He argues that such attractions can never reproduce nature because humans exist apart from the wildness of nature.
Artemis (Moon) runs and dances, wild and free among animals and a wild woman pack to create and preserve the wildness of the natural world.
For wildness will not long endure left to the uses of recreationists and exploiters, and neither management nor anything else will long endure without wildness.
246, 256) inherent in a rigid dualist understanding of nature and culture, we do not have to jettison the uniqueness of our experience of nature, but simply appreciate degrees of "wildness"--"the concept of artificialization immediately becomes more transparent and manageable" (p.
In Smith's living room the barely controlled wildness underlying domestic isolation and confinement--which started in the kitchen with a photograph of a madwoman on the wall and some plastic rats lurking in the corner--broke loose: Cast-iron Bo Peeps slept with their sheep scattered about the floor among paper leaves; a pile of worms sat on a woven chair seat; drawings of flowers done in pencil and blood hung askew on the wall; and women peered from the depths of dark large-format Polaroids, barely visible, as if appearing from the past.
Only the grace of the Maker and a hunk of Great-grandmaw Pettibone's venison jerky stuck in my flight boot (for luck, of course) got me through that wildness intact.
The pastoral progressiveness of Vermont gives way to the vibrant wildness of the Adirondacks, a region that snarls and resists the neat, suburban landscapes that surround it.
And like her amant, Marie-Loup shows few signs of the funky wildness her character is supposed to have.
As one who loved wild things, Muir felt that tame animals had lost much of their spirit and intelligence along with their wildness. A friend's dog would change his mind forever during one of his expeditions to Alaska; John Muir and Stickeen recounts the dramatic tale with captivating color illustrations of man, dog and icy wilderness.
Trevor Herriot, Jacob's Wound: A search for the spirit of wildness, 2004, $34.99 Cdn, hardcover, 358 pages.