wide of the mark


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wide of the mark

1. Literally, far from hitting a target. Wow, that shot was really wide of the mark. Is the ball even still on the green? Watch out, that arrow is going wide of the mark!
2. By extensions, inaccurate or wrong. I never once said that! Your reporter is completely wide of the mark in her accusations. I thought I knew what real estate costs around here, but wow, I was wide of the mark.
See also: mark, of, wide

*wide of the mark

 
1. Lit. far from the target. (*Typically: be ~; fall ~.) Tom's shot was wide of the mark. The pitch was quite fast but wide of the mark. The arrow fell wide of the mark.
2. Fig. inadequate; far from what is required or expected. (*Typically: be ~; fall ~.) Jane's efforts were sincere but wide of the mark. He failed the course because everything he did was wide of the mark.
See also: mark, of, wide

wide of the mark

COMMON If something that you say or write is wide of the mark, it is not correct or accurate. Any suggestions that we are putting pressure on Sir Michael to step down are very wide of the mark. For once, it seems that the government's figures might not be too wide of the mark. Note: The `mark' in this expression is the target used in archery or shooting.
See also: mark, of, wide
References in periodicals archive ?
Walton said: "Whilst Al Muhammadi was here on trial last summer we have had no subsequent contact with the player, his club or his representatives so these reports are wide of the mark.
We can see today just how wide of the mark he has been.
The England centre-half is convinced that the Scot's promise to step aside within the next three years will prove wide of the mark.
Dear Editor, Your anonymous correspondent is very wide of the mark when he contends that Michael Parkinson should refuse his knighthood (Little honour as principles are cast aside Post Agenda).
REPORTS that Nacho Novo had signed for the Sky Blues yesterday were wide of the mark, forcing the club to issue a statement saying they were no longer interested in the Rangers striker.
Perceptions of Wales are already wide of the mark over the border.
RUMOURS of David Beckham being unpopular within the England camp may be wide of the mark, but it seems not everyone shares his taste in clothes.
It is always difficult to put an accurate time estimate on this kind of injury, but six weeks is way wide of the mark,' insisted Hoddle on the club's website, www.
Giggs, right, says the doubters are wide of the mark - but he's happy to keep proving them wrong.
NB: Sadly, rumours Jordan was to entertain our troops in Afghanistan are wide of the mark - can we send "comedian" Jimmy Carr instead?
It is no good me standing here getting annoyed at people who have written stuff that isn't true or is wide of the mark.
Anybody who thinks we will breeze through this group, however, is wide of the mark.
Dear Editor, -Peter Hain MP is wide of the mark when he suggests that relocating up to 20,000 civil servants to the Midlands could solve the problems of government being too centralised.
Fears over his safety at Partick Thistle's Glasgow ground proved wide of the mark as the home supporters joined the visitors in giving him a hero's welcome.
PREDICTIONS of savage repercussions for football clubs in the wake of the ITV Digital collapse may not be too wide of the mark.