whole nine yards, the

the whole nine yards

The entirety of what's possible or available; all the related elements of something. Wow, Shelly really went the whole nine yards with toppings for the ice cream bar. There's much more than just whipped cream and sprinkles here! I want a traditional wedding, with the cake, the dress—the whole nine yards.
See also: nine, whole, yard
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

whole nine yards

Sl. the entire amount; everything, as far as possible. For you I'll go the whole nine yards. You're worth the whole nine yards.
See also: nine, whole, yard
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

whole nine yards, the

Everything that is relevant; the whole thing. For example, He decided to take everything to college-his books, his stereo, his computer, his skis, the whole nine yards . The source of this expression is not known, but there are several possibilities: the amount of cloth required to make a complete suit of clothes; the fully set sails of a three-masted ship where each mast carries three yards, that is, spars, to support the sails; or the amount of cement (in cubic yards) contained in a cement mixer for a big construction job. [Colloquial]
See also: nine, whole
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the whole nine yards

everything possible or available. North American informal
1999 Salman Rushdie The Ground Beneath Her Feet Then the lovers throw a party, and what a party! Dancing, wine, the whole nine yards.
See also: nine, whole, yard
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the ˌwhole ˌnine ˈyards

(informal, especially American English) everything, or a situation which includes everything: When Des cooks dinner he always goes the whole nine yards, with three courses and and a choice of dessert.
See also: nine, whole, yard
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the whole nine yards

n. the entire amount; everything. (Origin unknown. It does not matter what substance is being referred to. It means all of it, no matter what it is.) For you I’ll go the whole nine yards.
See also: nine, whole, yard
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

whole nine yards, the

The entire distance; the whole thing. The source of this term has been lost, but as usual there are several etymological theories. The following were suggested by William Safire’s correspondents: nine yards once constituted the entire amount put onto a bolt of cloth, and for an ornate garment the “whole nine yards” would be used; the standard large cement mixer holds nine yards of cement, and a big construction job would use up the “whole nine yards”; in the square-rigged, three-masted sailing ship of former times, each mast carried three “yards” (the spars supporting the sails), and the expression “whole nine yards” would mean that the sails were fully set. Novelist Lee Child used it in 61 Hours (2010): “Which means he was ready for a full-blown transaction. A conversation, a discussion, the whole nine yards.”
See also: nine, whole
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

whole nine yards

The entire amount or distance. Of all phrases in the English language, few have as many supposed sources as this one. Among the possibilities are the nine yards of material from which tailors made expensive men's suits; the nine cubic yards of concrete that concrete trucks held; the nine yards (or spars) on a three-masted sailing ship; the volume of grave soil; and the length of a World War II aircraft ammunition belt. However, none of these or any other explanation has been conclusively proven. The phrase first appeared during the 1960s of out Vietnam War writings with no further explanation. Other phrases that refer to everything are “all the marbles,” “the whole shooting match,” “the whole ball of wax,” and “the whole shebang.”
See also: nine, whole, yard
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Along Came Polly, The Whole Nine Yards, The Longest Yard, Clockwatchers, Lost In Space...
Mission dislodged The Whole Nine Yards, the hit-man comedy starring Bruce Willis as the assassin and Friends' Matthew Perry, from the number one spot after three weeks.