who's who


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who's who

1. The specific, individual people in a pair or group. I have a large number of people working for me, but I still try my best to remember who's who. Because of their uniforms and helmets, I can never tell who's who when I'm watching our kids play football.
2. A gathering of the most famous, important, or influential individuals in a larger group, field, or profession. The gala event is shaping up to be a who's who of the film industry. The expedition—the single most expensive ever commissioned—will feature a who's who of renowned scientists and researchers.
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who's who

The outstanding or best-known individuals of a group, as in Tonight's concert features a veritable who's who of musicians. This expression comes from the name of a famous reference work, Who's Who, first published in 1849, which contains biographical sketches of famous individuals and is regularly updated. Its name in turn was based on who is who, that is, the identity of each of a number of persons, a phrase dating from the late 1300s. [Early 1900s]
See also: who

who’s ˈwho

people’s names, jobs, status, etc: You’ll soon find out who’s who in the office.
See also: who
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone in Who's Who is invited to compile his or her own entry, so entries can be as long or as short as personalities wish.
The 2019 edition of Who's Who is published by A&C Black at PS325.
In his Who's Who entry Mr McCartney lists his recreations as "Huddersfield Town AFC, Huddersfield Giants RLFC, Yorkshire CCC, tennis, eating Hinchcliffe's pies."
Labour MEP for the Northeast, Ms Kirton-Darling said: "To me the idea of 'Who's Who' is about an 'old boys network' and afternoons on the golf course wheeling and dealing.
Dollar said the remaining inventory would be discounted significantly with price reductions as much as 70%, and all recognition items will be sold on a "first come, first served" basis through the Who's Who Web site at www.wwacu.org.
He has been selected for inclusion based on the his business achievements and is among the top two per cent of directors in the UK, aged 35 or under, who is eligible for inclusion in the Who's Who title.
Also making his first Who's Who entry is New Scientist editor and ex-Daily Telegraph science correspondent Roger Highfield, 50, born in Griffithstown, Rhondda.
It's the only way to explain some interesting absences from the new edition of Who's Who, published for the first time in 1849 and weighing in at pounds 125 a copy this year.
The Screen Printing and Graphic Imaging Association (SGIA) has distributed the 2000-2001 edition of its "Who's Who in SGIA" to its members.
The latest "Who's Who" from Armstrong and Associates addresses a rapidly emerging supply chain requirement: how to physically fulfill orders made over the Internet.
Over the years, the words "Who's Who" have become synonymous with acknowledging individual achievement in a significant area of public or professional life.
JAILED Jonathan Aitken has collected a piece of surprise mail with his breakfast porridge - an entry form for Who's Who. The ex-Cabinet Minister found that 18 months for perjury and perverting justice was no bar to a a place among the nation's distinguished names.
Butler Snow is pleased to announce that 10 of its attorneys have been recognized by Who's Who Legal.
Farmingdale, NY, May 04, 2016 --(PR.com)-- Strathmore's Who's Who selects mid to upper level management professionals from companies throughout the United States as well as internationally.
TWO Huddersfield people rub shoulders with Olympic champions as newcomers in the 2013 edition of Who's Who.