whit

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care a whit

To care just the smallest amount. (A "whit" is an iota.) Often used in the negative. I don't care a whit what the neighbors say, I'm not taking that fence down!
See also: care, whit

not one whit

old-fashioned Not at all or in any way. We are not concerned about the investigation—not one whit. We have nothing to hide. A: "Do you mind if I tag along this afternoon?" B: "Not one whit!"
See also: not, one, whit

not a whit

old-fashioned Not at all or in any way. We are not concerned about the investigation—not a whit. We have nothing to hide. A: "Do you mind if I tag along this afternoon?" B: "Not a whit!"
See also: not, whit

never a whit

old-fashioned Not at all or in any way. Sinful thought, though less condemnable than action, is never a whit less morally repugnant.
See also: never, whit

to wit

That is; more precisely; namely. Often used in technical or formal writing. The officer testified to having found several grams of a Class B narcotic, to wit, cocaine, on the defendant's person at the time of arrest. The plot is absolutely absurd, such as it is—to wit, an axe-wielding murderer teams up with a cyborg cop to stop an alien invasion.
See also: wit

didn't care a whit

 and don't care a whit
didn't care at all. Sally thought Joe liked her, but he didn't care a whit about her. I don't care a whit what you do with my old clothes.
See also: care, whit

to wit

namely; that is; that is to say. The criminal was punished; to wit, he received a 20-year sentence. Many students, to wit Mary, Bill, Sue, and Anne, complained about their teacher.
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to wit

That is to say, namely, as in There are three good reasons for not going, to wit, we don't want to, we don't have to, and we can't get a reservation . This expression comes from the now archaic verb to wit, meaning "know or be aware of," not heard except in this usage. [Late 1500s]
See also: wit

not a/one ˈwhit

(old-fashioned) not at all; not the smallest amount: The party leaders care not a whit about the principles of democracy and freedom.
See also: not, one, whit

to ˈwit

(old-fashioned, formal) used when you are about to be more exact about something you have just referred to: I told him I only spoke one foreign language, to wit French.
See also: wit

to wit

That is to say; namely.
See also: wit

to wit

Namely, that is to say. This expression comes from the sixteenth-century archaic verb to wit, meaning to know or be aware of. The current usage has long been a cliché. It often appears before a list of some kind, as in, “His whole family plans to attend, to wit, his parents, siblings, aunts, uncles, and cousins.”
See also: wit
References in periodicals archive ?
The day after Whitsun, known as Whit Monday, was a public holiday in the UK until 1978.
As it depended on Easter - which does not have a fixed date because it is scheduled to fall on the first Sunday after the first full moon following the Spring Equinox - Whit also moved around the calendar from year-to-year.
For me, and every crusty old codger like me, Spring Bank was Whit Monday'
May Day bank holiday next year, for instance, is on May 5, while Whit Sunday, or Pentecost, is May 11.
ON THE MARCH: There seemed to be very little to smile about as the people of the town braved the rain to take part in the Whit procession from St Joseph's Church, Aspley.
Mrs A Lee, of Lindley, is clear that her memories are of Whit Walks.
It was always held on a Whit Monday, not the week before, and we always had new Sunday clothes.
On Whit Monday the Sunday School teachers went in the morning to prepare the tea, which for us was potted beef sandwiches, currant teacakes and assorted cakes.
But there's far more to Whit Friday than the march contests.
For us it was generally Whit Monday when youngsters, showing off their new dresses and suits, with many a new penny tucked in a pocket, paraded behind a band, stopping at selected spots then, to the accompaniment of the band, sang a few verses of a well-known hymn or two.
The churches still hold their Processions of Witness on Whit Friday morning in Greenfield and Delph, while in Uppermill five or six churches come together for a united service.