whitewash

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whitewash

1. tv. to make something look better than it really is; to conceal something bad. Now, don’t try to whitewash this incident. Open up about it.
2. n. an act or campaign of covering up something bad. They tried to give the scandal the old whitewash, but it didn’t work.

whitewash, a

A glossing over of bad conduct, dishonesty, or other misdeeds. Using clean paint as a metaphor for concealing misconduct dates at least from the early eighteenth century. “The greater part of whitewashing is done with ink,” wrote George D. Prentice (Prenticeana, 1860).
References in periodicals archive ?
Gidiney appears as a "whitewasher" living at the street address of 156 Green.
Whitewashers called Merah "a victim." Yet the murders he committed should raise far more serious questions about Europe than those committed by Breivik.
1813 in Pennsylvania--after 1860), a coachman and whitewasher, and Catherine (c.1814 in Maryland--?)
We got a card to come and get the relief money for soldiers' families." Following his discharge in 1865, Samuel Sisco reunited with his family and went back to his work as a whitewasher. He fell ill shortly after his return to the city and, unable to work any longer, he moved to the Colored Home near 72nd Street where he died in 1880.
And neither whitewashers nor demonizers can help it to achieve the second.
Killing 40 civilians in one go is "reasonable," says Israel army ethicist Since the Israeli army killed more than 2,200 Palestinians in the besieged Gaza Strip last summer, including more than 500 children, a dedicated army of official and unofficial whitewashers has been mobilized on a mission to rescue Israel's bloodstained public image.
Keeping silent on the matter effectively whitewashes the whitewashers.
Roma people are settled or self-employed blacksmiths, musicians, day laborers, flower sellers, whitewashers, etc.
Cover-uppers and whitewashers are usually the fashionable enemy of the day: the US, the Russians, Zionists.
Whitewashers of Muslim antisemitism often falsely claim that antisemitism problems among Muslims are limited to poorly educated hooligans.
The story was originally taken from The Arabian Nights, later dramatized by Friedrich Schiller (1802), adapted for the opera by Giacomo Puccini (1926), and retold by Bertold Brecht (not surprisingly) as Turandot, or the Whitewashers' Congress (1953-54).