white-collar


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white-collar

Describing a professional or position whose work responsibilities do not include manual labor (i.e. like that of a so-called blue-collar worker). The name comes from the formal dress typically worn by such workers. One of the problems is that too many people are training for white-collar jobs, when what we need are more highly skilled blue-collar workers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of Chuck Banks' caseload is civil, but if he wades into criminal defense, it is only for white-collar cases.
Prof Levi has been doing national and transnational research on white-collar and organised crime, money laundering and proceeds of crime confiscation since 1972.
1a]: Law enforcement believes that the Internet has made white-collar crime easier for criminals;
His areas of research and teaching interest include white-collar and corporate crime, punishment and criminal justice system capacity issues, medical fraud, financial crime, identity theft, and cyber crime.
attorney I was a generalist for many years before I started prosecuting white-collar crimes.
Data from former white-collar workers, however, suggest that retirement even at 65 years of age can be disappointingly empty and that a return to work is desirable (Macdonald, Brown, & Buchanan, 2001).
At the same time, white-collar crime is not restricted to wealthy CEO's.
The 2005 happiness index, which quizzed 1250 workers, also reveals a new trend for parity of pay satisfaction between vocational and white-collar workers.
Along with the flight of white-collar jobs, Americans contend with another substantial threat to their livelihoods.
Some of these agent resources were shifted away from drug, white-collar, and violent crime enforcement programs.
Profit Without Honor: White-Collar Crime and the Looting of America, 3rd Edition.
The surprise international calling plan used to provoke a head scratching, gee-whiz-what-will-they-think-of-next amazement, but these days the promise of a transglobal service industry has been transformed into the political "problem" of white-collar outsourcing.
The students hear from law officers and judges who have had white-collar criminals before them, as well as white-collar criminals who have been convicted and have served their time.
The CPA profession's strong reputation for upholding the highest standards of business ethics and conduct has convinced the Federal Bureau of Investigation that the AICPA could be an invaluable ally in the nation's war on white-collar crime and in restoring investor confidence to the financial markets, according to a ranking FBI official.
White-collar offenders are a problematic group of offenders for corrections theorists and practitioners.