whisk off

(redirected from whisks us off)

whisk off

1. To remove something (from some place) very suddenly or hurriedly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whisk" and "off." The journalists had barely been given a glimpse at the company's secretive new prototype before it was being whisked off again. I wish you hadn't whisked my plate off like that—I was still eating!
2. To brush or sweep something off of the surface of someone or something else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whisk" and "off." My wife whisked the cat hair off my shoulder before I left for my interview. Let me just whisk off these hair clippings before you sit down, sir.
3. To escort or accompany someone away (from some place) very abruptly or hurriedly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whisk" and "off." Security forces whisked the president off after the first gunshots were heard. I wish my husband would just whisk me off to somewhere exotic like Thailand or the Bahamas for a week.
4. To bring someone on a romantic or exciting journey (to some place) away from home. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whisk" and "off." I wish my husband would just whisk me off to somewhere exotic like Thailand or the Bahamas for a week. Before we knew it, we were whisked off on a whirlwind adventure around the globe.
See also: off, whisk

whisk (someone or an animal) off

to brush [something] off someone or an animal. The barber quickly whisked him off and collected the fee. The barber whisked off the customer.
See also: off, whisk

whisk someone or something off (to something)

to move someone or something to something or some place rapidly. The government agents whisked the witness off to a secret place. They whisked off the suspect to a holding cell.
See also: off, whisk

whisk something off (of) someone or something

 and whisk something off
to brush something off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The barber whisked the loose hairs off of the customer. The barber whisked off the loose hairs.
See also: off, whisk

whisk off

v.
1. To remove something from the surface of someone or something with quick light sweeping motions: My friend whisked the crumbs off the table.
2. To remove something or someone from something swiftly and quietly: The waiter whisked the dish off the table. They whisked the actor off the stage.
3. To escort, conduct, or carry someone or something swiftly and quietly away: The bodyguards whisked off the politician after the speech. My parents whisked us off. The victim was whisked off to the hospital.
4. To depart on an errand swiftly and quietly: The salesperson whisked off and returned with the perfect gift.
5. To indulge someone's fancy by conducting or transporting them away: My partner whisked me off to New York. The butler whisked off the guests to the dining room.
See also: off, whisk
References in periodicals archive ?
Alison whisks us off on Bear and Bunny's adventures, as they reassure each other that there are no circumstances in which they do not love each other - Bear helping Bunny up a tricky slope, the pair diving down to the bottom of the ocean to see sleeping octopuses, dancing in puddles with a cheeky pair of frogs, and finally tucking themselves in to bed Morecambe and Wise-style to read a storybook.
The train whisks us off to the mountain and then chugs along up the steep railway to Krabel.
A snowmobile whisks us off at speed into the picturesque woods, stopping at clues to his presence - piles of presents, sleigh - until we finally reach the highly convincing traditional wooden cabin where excitable elves are throwing snowballs and jumping up and down at our arrival.
FROM his base in Newcastle, widely travelled author Dan Smith whisks us off to exotic and often dangerous places.
After Floyd has paid his respect to eggs, he whisks us off to a monastery on an island, where in between paying and meditating, the monks are expert wine makers.
He whisks us off to Abyssinia, now Eritrea and again Flashman, the seducer and betrayer, the yellow-livered and unwilling participant in great events is, in the end, the hero of the hour.