whisk

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whisk someone around

to move someone around rapidly from place to place. I didn't get much chance to see the city. They just whisked me around. We whisked around the visitor from place to place.
See also: around, whisk

whisk (someone or an animal) off

to brush [something] off someone or an animal. The barber quickly whisked him off and collected the fee. The barber whisked off the customer.
See also: off, whisk

whisk someone or something away

to move someone or something out of the way rapidly. The firemen came and whisked the students away to a safe place. The agents whisked away a number of people.
See also: away, whisk

whisk someone or something off (to something)

to move someone or something to something or some place rapidly. The government agents whisked the witness off to a secret place. They whisked off the suspect to a holding cell.
See also: off, whisk

whisk something off (of) someone or something

 and whisk something off
to brush something off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The barber whisked the loose hairs off of the customer. The barber whisked off the loose hairs.
See also: off, whisk

whisk away

v.
1. To remove something with quick light sweeping motions: The waiter whisked the crumbs away. My girlfriend whisked away the check before I could see it.
2. To escort, conduct, or carry someone or something swiftly and quietly away: The bodyguards whisked away the politician after the speech. The ambulance whisked the accident victim away to the hospital.
3. To indulge someone's fancy by conducting or transporting them away: I was whisked away from my boring life after I accepted the job offer. My boyfriend whisked me away to Paris.
See also: away, whisk

whisk off

v.
1. To remove something from the surface of someone or something with quick light sweeping motions: My friend whisked the crumbs off the table.
2. To remove something or someone from something swiftly and quietly: The waiter whisked the dish off the table. They whisked the actor off the stage.
3. To escort, conduct, or carry someone or something swiftly and quietly away: The bodyguards whisked off the politician after the speech. My parents whisked us off. The victim was whisked off to the hospital.
4. To depart on an errand swiftly and quietly: The salesperson whisked off and returned with the perfect gift.
5. To indulge someone's fancy by conducting or transporting them away: My partner whisked me off to New York. The butler whisked off the guests to the dining room.
See also: off, whisk
References in periodicals archive ?
By explaining to them how different whisks facilitate specific tasks, retailers can generate multiple sales.
Generally, sauce whisks range in size from eight to 18 inches; however, the 14-inch one is the most popular.
The best balloon whisks have thin rather than thick wires, since less pressure should be applied to the cream and egg whites and the balloon whisk will not push out air already incorporated.
Flat whisks also work well for beating eggs lightly in a shallow bowl.
Coiled whisks serve more as a tool for whipping than whisking as they mix and aerate small amounts of thin batters.
Manufacturers have become quite inventive in tweaking the four basic whisk shapes in an effort to develop more useful whisks.
Jug whisks are narrower so they can fit inside a jug for emulsifying salad dressings.