whipping

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pencil whip

1. To complete a form or record, especially a checklist, without doing the work required or by providing falsified or incomplete information. It has come to light that the safety supervisor aboard the oil rig had been pencil whipping his observational reports for several weeks leading up to the disaster.
2. To approve such a form without actually verifying that the contents are accurate or properly completed. We're supposed to fill out a detailed checklist after each shift, but I know my boss just pencil whips them.
See also: pencil, whip

pussy whip

vulgar slang Of a woman, to control a partner, typically a man, in a domineering, condescending, emasculating manner. Sometimes hyphenated or written as a single word. Dude, my girlfriend and I make decisions together. Just because she's putting her foot down about something doesn't mean she's pussy whipping me. I think there's an element whereby male employees feel as though they're being pussy-whipped if they have to take orders from a female boss. I'm glad she makes you happy, Tom, but don't let her pussywhip you.
See also: pussy, whip

whip (one) off to (some place)

To take one to a new location in a very hasty, sudden, or impromptu manner. Tom showed up at my door and whipped me off to the Bahamas in his private jet. The army swooped in and began whipping survivors off to a secure location several miles away.
See also: off, whip

whip (one's) ass

1. rude slang, verb To defeat someone or something decisively. We weren't prepared for that game, and the other team whipped our asses.
2. rude slang, verb To physically attack one; to beat one up. I'll whip your ass if I ever see you talking to my girlfriend again.
See also: ass, whip

whip (one's) wire

vulgar slang To masturbate. "Wire" is used as a euphemism for "penis," so the term is only applied to males. He talks on and on about how much of a ladies' man he is, but I bet he spends most nights whipping his wire all alone.
See also: whip, wire

whip (someone or something) into shape

To return someone or something into acceptable condition or behavior, especially through direct, efficient, and practical means. The president won the election on his promise to whip the economy into shape by overhauling outdated or inefficient legislation. What he really needs is a mentor who will whip him into shape.
See also: shape, whip

whip (someone or something) on

1. To strike someone or some animal on a particular part of the body with or as with a whip. He whipped the horse on its flanks, but it refused to move an inch. One of the other boys started whipping Thomas on the butt with a wet, rolled-up towel.
2. To force someone or some animal to continue moving onward by striking them or it with or as with a whip. We were near the point of collapse, but the prison guard whipped us on. You're going to kill that poor donkey with the way you whip it on like that.
See also: on, whip

whip around

1. To turn or move in the opposite direction very quickly, suddenly, or forcefully. The gate whipped around and slammed into her because of the gust of wind. I whipped around when I heard someone say my name, but there was no one there.
2. To cause someone or something to turn or move in the opposite direction very quickly, suddenly, or forcefully. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "around." The force of the motor whipped the cable around so fast that it slashed my arm open. She whipped the child around and started performing the Heimlich maneuver on him.
3. To move around something with great speed or haste. I was just about to step off the curb when some maniac whipped around the corner in an SUV. The runners whipped around the track at an incredible pace.
4. To move from place to place very quickly or hastily, especially in a vehicle. As soon as I got my first car, I spent most evenings whipping around town with my friends. Be careful out there tonight. There are going to be a lot of drunken idiots whipping around on the roads.
See also: around, whip

whip away

To remove and escort someone or something from some place or take someone or something away from someone in a very hurried or aggressive manner. Security forces whipped the president away after the first gunshots were heard. After giving the journalists a very brief glimpse at the prototype, the company whipped it away back into their lab. The police officer whipped the parent away from her children.
See also: away, whip

whip back

1. To jerk, snap, or thrash backward with great and sudden force. He held the branch back to let Mary pass, but he let go before I got there, and it whipped back into my face. You need to make sure the tarpaulin is pegged down securely. We don't want it to come whipping back during a storm.
2. To throw or hurl something with great and sudden force back (to someone or something). In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "back." She regained possession of the ball and whipped it back to the shooting guard, who sank the ball for two points. I asked him to return the device, and he whipped it back to me so hard that it smashed against the wall into a dozen pieces.
3. To blow, jerk, or yank someone or something backward with great and sudden force. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "back." A huge gust of wind whipped back the gate just as I was trying to shut it. The contestants started running, but the bungee cables strapped to their harnesses whipped them back toward their starting points.
4. To transport or delivery someone or something back to some previous location very hastily or suddenly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "whip" and "back." Her parents arrived at her dorm room and whipped her back home after they found out she had been skipping all of her classes. The agent gathered the politician into the car and whipped him back to the embassy.
5. To cause someone to return in their mind to some previous place or moment in time. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "whip" and "back." The teacher struck her desk with the ruler, whipping me back from my daydream. The scent of the pine whipped him right back to the forest behind his grandfather's cabin where he had spent so much time as a child.
See also: back, whip

whip by

To pass by (someone or something) exceptionally at a very fast pace. After the dam burst, a flood of water came whipping by. The jet fighter's whipped by our plane so fast that many people didn't even see it happen.
See also: by, whip

whip into (something)

1. To mix one ingredient rapidly into another so as to blend them completely together. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "whip" and "into." Very slowly whip the melted butter into the eggs until the whole amount has emulsified.
2. To stir or whisk something very rapidly until it changes into a new state or condition. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "whip" and "into." Once you've whipped the egg whites into a meringue, begin layering it on top of the lemon mixture in the pie tin.
3. To enter some place in great haste. He whipped into the room and knocked a vase off the table.
4. To cause someone or some group through provocation or agitation to adopt a new and extreme state of mind, especially a negative one. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "whip" and "into." The organizer whipped the mob into a frenzy, leading to a riot along Main Street. I'm being whipped into a great big ball of anxiety waiting for the doctor to call me with the test results.
5. To cause someone or something to have or adopt an acceptable condition, state, or behavior. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "whip" and "into"; typically followed by "shape." What he really needs is a strict mentor who will whip him into shape. We've got two hours to whip this house into shape before Mom and Dad get back.
See also: whip

whip off

1. To remove something (from someone, something, or oneself) in a very rushed or disorderly fashion. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "off." We all whipped off our shirts and shorts and dove into the sparkling lake. She whipped the tablecloth off the table so fast that all the champagne glasses balanced in a pyramid remained standing.
2. To produce or create something very rapidly or hastily. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "off." I whipped a message off to my mother about next weekend, but she hasn't gotten back to me yet. He's been whipping off new books so quickly that, unless you're a diehard fan of the series, it can be hard to keep up.
See also: off, whip

whip out

1. To take something out (of something or some place) and present it with great alacrity or flourish. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "out." No sooner had I mentioned that I was looking for a car to buy than she had whipped her business card out of her pocket for me to take. The FBI agent whipped out her badge when I opened the door.
2. To jerk or yank something out (of something or some place). A noun or pronoun is typically used between "whip" and "out." She grabbed onto the obstruction and, with a mighty heave, whipped it right out of the pipe. Something caught on my hearing aid and whipped it out of my ear.
3. To remove someone from some place in a very hasty, disorderly, or informal manner. A noun or pronoun is typically used between "whip" and "out." I can't believe you would whip me out of school just like that—all my friends are there! If things ever become dangerous there, we'll whip you out as fast as possible.
4. To produce or create something very rapidly or hastily. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "out." I whipped a message out to my mother about next weekend, but she hasn't gotten back to me yet. He's been whipping out new books so quickly that, unless you're a diehard fan of the series, it can be hard to keep up.
See also: out, whip

whip over

1. To move above (someone or something) very quickly, promptly, or hastily. The wind howled as it whipped over our heads. We watched the tiny biplane whip over the tops of the trees.
2. To move or travel over (to some place) very quickly, promptly, or hastily. I whipped over to the post office as soon as I had the money together to send it to the landlord. The school nurse whipped over as soon as she heard a child had fallen off the play structure.
3. To send, transport, or deliver something (to someone else) very quickly, promptly, or hastily. A noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "over." They said they could whip the documents over to you in the morning. I'll whip over a new contract for you to review.
See also: over, whip

whip the cat

1. obsolete To get very drunk My guess is that Father is out whipping the cat again, while I remain here providing for our family.
2. obsolete To shirk one's work or duties. The luckless fellow was accused of whipping the cat, and just like that, was removed from his lowly job as quickly as he had come to fill it.
3. obsolete To play a practical joke (on someone). They led me to believe my family had been taken by the authorities, but it soon became clear they were merely whipping the cat.
4. obsolete To go door to door to do work for others, as an itinerant tailor, carpenter, or other laborer might. The poor fellow has been reduced to whipping the cat, and you can see him soliciting the houses every day looking for a bit of work that might see him eat for the next few days.
See also: cat, whip

whip the dummy

vulgar slang To masturbate. "Dummy" is used as a euphemism for "penis," so the term is only applied to males. He talks on and on about how much of a ladies' man he is, but I bet he spends most nights whipping the dummy all by himself.
See also: dummy, whip

whip through

1. To pass through some place or thing very rapidly or violently. The runaway bull whipped through the store, causing hundreds of dollars of damage in the process. An icy, howling gale whipped through the city.
2. To complete, accomplish, or work through something with great speed or ease. Don't just whip through the book like that, or you won't remember anything that happens a week later. Thanks to all my studying, I was able to whip through the test in less than an hour.
3. To mix something together thoroughly and evenly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "through." Make sure you whip the eggs through or they will separate when you begin adding the butter.
See also: through, whip

whip up

1. To excite or incite strong emotions. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "up." He has deliberately whipped up his supporters to a state of frenzy. Mrs. Johnson always knew how to whip up enthusiasm among the students. The kids will never go to bed now that you've whipped them up.
2. To agitate or create through agitation or turbulence. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "up." The strong winds whipped up the ocean and made it unsafe to go into the water. The cold front will meet the warm front and most certainly whip up a severe thunderstorm.
3. To prepare very quickly and often easily. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whip" and "up." No need to order out—I'll just whip up dinner real quick. Should we buy a cake or can you whip one up tonight? Please whip up some name tags for the last-minute attendees—they don't have to be perfect.
See also: up, whip

whipping boy

A person or thing that is blamed for problems, often those caused by someone or something else. Bobby got tired of being the whipping boy for the mischief caused by his older brothers. Video games have become the whipping boy for the violent behavior displayed by today's youth.
See also: boy, whipping

whip around

 
1. to reverse suddenly. (As with the tip of a whip.) The rope suddenly whipped around and struck me in the face. A branch whipped around and tore my shirt. 2. to turn around very quickly and suddenly. John whipped around when he heard the noise. Claire whipped around to face her opponent.
See also: around, whip

whip back (on someone)

[for something] to snap back and strike someone. The branch whipped back and struck Jill in the leg. It whipped back and slapped my side.
See also: back, whip

whip someone or something around

to cause someone or something to reverse direction quickly. The roller coaster whipped around the riders, right and left, until they were almost sick. The sharp turn whipped me around, but I wasn't hurt.
See also: around, whip

whip someone up

to excite or stir up someone. Well, you've certainly whipped them up with that speech. Harry whipped up the crowd with a few good jokes.
See also: up, whip

whip something away (from someone)

to jerk something away from someone suddenly. The mugger whipped Sally's purse away from her and ran. The thief whipped away the purse.
See also: away, whip

whip something off

 
1. Inf. to do or create something quickly. If you need another receipt, I can whip one off in a jiffy. She whipped off another set of earrings for the tourist.
2. Inf. to remove something, such as an item of clothing, quickly. He whipped the coat off and dived into the water. I whipped off my cap.
See also: off, whip

whip something out

 
1. Inf. to complete making or working on something quickly. I think I can whip one out for you very quickly. The factory whips out twenty of these every minute.
2. Inf. to jerk something out [of some place]. Liz whipped a pencil out of her pocket. She whipped out a pencil and signed the contract.
See also: out, whip

whip something over (to someone)

Fig. to send or give something to someone with great speed. I will whip this letter over to Mr. Franklin right away. Sam whipped the package over to Alice immediately.
See also: over, whip

whip something up

to prepare, create, or put something together. I haven't written my report yet, but I'll whip one up before the deadline. I will whip up the most beautiful arrangement you have ever seen.
See also: up, whip

whip through something

Fig. to work through something very fast. Do this carefully. Don't just whip through it. She whipped through her homework and went outside to play.
See also: through, whip

whipping boy

Fig. someone who is punished for someone else's misdeeds. The president has turned out to be the whipping boy for his party.
See also: boy, whipping

whipping boy

A scapegoat, as in This department's always been the whipping boy when things don't go well. This expression alludes to the former practice of keeping a boy to be whipped in place of a prince who was to be punished. [Early 1900s]
See also: boy, whipping

whip up

1. Arouse, excite, as in The speaker whipped up the mob [Early 1800s]
2. Prepare quickly, as in I can easily whip up some lunch. This usage was first recorded in 1611.
See also: up, whip

a whipping boy

If someone is a whipping boy, people blame them when things go wrong. `There won't be a white paper,' one minister said yesterday. `It wouldn't solve anything. It would just make the prime minister a whipping boy for both the left and right.' This is the story of how America's favorite whipping boy became her favorite son. Note: A whipping boy was a boy who was educated with a prince and was punished for the prince's mistakes because tutors were not allowed to hit the prince.
See also: boy, whipping

whip the cat

1 complain or moan. 2 be sorry; show remorse. Australian & New Zealand informal
See also: cat, whip

a ˈwhipping boy

a person who is blamed or punished for the mistakes of another person: The directors are clearly responsible for what happened, but they’re sure to find a whipping boy lower down the company.It was your fault, and I am not going to be your whipping boy.In the past when a royal prince made a mistake in his lessons, another boy was whipped (= punished) for his mistakes.
See also: boy, whipping

whip by

v.
1. To pass quickly, as of a gust of wind or an interval of time: As I got older, the years whipped by.
2. To pass someone or something quickly: The runner in second place whipped by the leader.
See also: by, whip

whip off

v.
1. To snatch, pull, or remove something in a sudden manner: The worker whipped off his cap. The storm whipped the shingles off.
2. To snatch, pull, or remove something from something in a sudden manner: The storm whipped the roof off the house.
3. To make or produce something quickly: The guitarist whipped off a chord. I whipped the letter to the editor off in 10 minutes.
See also: off, whip

whip out

v.
1. To take out or present something suddenly or quickly, often with a flourish: I whipped out my new credit card to pay for dinner. We didn't know the police had warrants until they whipped them out.
2. To make or produce something quickly: The new assembly line can whip out 30 cases an hour. The novelist whipped ten pages out each day.
See also: out, whip

whip through

v.
1. To move rapidly through something or some place, as of a gust of wind or violent storm: The wind whipped through the canyon.
2. To accomplish or proceed with something swiftly: The students whipped through the easy homework assignment.
3. To read something quickly: I whipped through a magazine while I waited for my appointment.
4. To beat and froth up some liquid thoroughly: You must first whip the batter through before adding the sugar.
See also: through, whip

whip up

v.
1. To churn or agitate something into a state of turbulence: The storm whipped up the sea, endangering the ships. The wind whipped the fire up so that it raged out of control. The car whipped up the leaves along the road.
2. To cause something to form by churning or agitating: The storm whipped up massive waves in the normally calm sea. The hurricane whipped several tornados up in its wake.
3. To rouse the emotions of some group of people; excite some group of people: The candidate whipped up the mob with talk of reform. The finale whipped the audience up into a frenzy.
4. To summon some collective emotion or sentiment by exciting a group of people: The promoters whipped up enthusiasm for the new film. We'll need a lot of hype to sell this product, and our marketers can whip it up.
5. To prepare something quickly or easily: We whipped up a light lunch before setting out. I whipped some oatmeal up in just a few minutes.
6. whip up on To defeat someone decisively; outdo someone: The home team whipped up on its rival last weekend.
See also: up, whip

whip off

verb
See also: off, whip

whip the dummy

verb
See also: dummy, whip

whipping boy, a

A scapegoat; one who receives the blame and/or punishment for another’s mistakes or misdeeds. The term comes from the early practice of keeping a boy to be whipped in place of a prince who was to be punished. Sir William Petrie used the term figuratively in Ancient Egypt (1914): “With some writers . . . Manetho is the whipping-boy, who must always be flogged when anything is not understood.”
See also: whipping
References in periodicals archive ?
"Whipping punishment (in ta'zir cases) is not supposed to exceed more than ten strokes, except in hudud cases which is under the rights of Allah.
Whipping punishment has come under close scrutiny lately.
* Library research is conducted on relevant materials on whipping punishment.
* This research also conducts a comparative study between the basic Syariah principles on whipping punishment and the provisions on whipping under the Syariah Criminal Procedure Act (Federal Territories) 1997.
* Interviews are also conducted to gauge the level of understanding of the general public on Syariah whipping punishment.
Whipping Punishment under Syariah Criminal Procedure (Federal Territories) Act 1997:
Legal provisions pertaining to execution of whipping punishment could be found in most Syariah Criminal Procedure Enactments in Malaysia.
Section 125(2) provides specifications for the actual whip to be used for whipping. It must be made of skin or rattan, smooth and even.
The sources relating to the whipping of Richard Moore tell conflicting stories that cannot easily be reconciled.
The Cincinnati Gazette, which in effect broke the story of the whipping, had for many years presented a Republican critique of the South and now carried an abolitionist fervor into the postwar world.
In this account of the whipping, which is quoted in full, Richard Moore, though "colored," was clearly identified by the Gazette as "one of us." In an act of what Lynn Hunt has termed "imagined empathy," the Gazette implicitly included Moore in its community of loyal unionists.
The Cincinnati Gazette's report on the whipping drew a rapid-fire response from the main newspaper in Lincoln County.
What the Gazette had portrayed as a heinous assault on a Union veteran by recalcitrant rebels, the Observer saw as a deserved whipping of a bad man, a former slave.
These two newspaper accounts of the whipping diverge so widely that they scarcely seem to represent the same event.
Emotions encapsulated within and aroused by the whipping of Richard Moore contained heavy doses of anger, frustration, and moral indignation.