whet (one's) appetite

whet (one's) appetite

To induce or increase one's interest in something. The first chapter of that novel really whetted my appetite—I'm eager to read more of it tonight.
See also: appetite, whet

whet someone's appetite

Fig. to cause someone to be interested in something and to be eager to have, know, learn, etc., more about it. Seeing that film really whetted my sister's appetite for horror films. She now sees as many as possible. My appetite for theater was whetted when I was very young.
See also: appetite, whet

whet one's appetite

Arouse one's interest or eagerness, as in That first Schubert piece whetted my appetite; I hope she sings some others. This idiom, first recorded in 1612, transfers making one hungry for food to other kinds of eagerness.
See also: appetite, whet

whet someone's appetite

COMMON If something whets your appetite for a particular thing, it makes you want it. Winning the World Championship should have whetted his appetite for more success. Her appetite already whetted by the book, she took a trip to England. Note: You can also say that something whets the appetite. The series is entertaining, and it certainly whets the appetite. Note: To whet a knife means to sharpen it.
See also: appetite, whet

whet someone's appetite

stimulate someone's interest by partial revelation.
See also: appetite, whet

ˌwhet somebody’s ˈappetite

make somebody feel hungry; make somebody interested in something: Don’t eat too much of this dish. It’s only to whet your appetite for the main course.One of my teachers lent me a book about climbing, and it really whetted my appetite.
If you whet a knife, sword, etc., you make it sharper.
See also: appetite, whet