where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise

where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise

It is better to remain unaware or ignorant of things that may otherwise cause one stress; if you don't know about something, you don't need to worry about it. From the 1742 poem "Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College," by Thomas Gray. I feel like all the news in the world today is depressing, and the only way to get on with your life is to completely ignore it all. As they say, where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise. Look, I know you get stressed about what the kids eat when they stay at your mother's house, but they're happy and have plenty of energy. When ignorance is bliss, it's folly to be wise.
See also: folly, ignorance, wise

Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise.

Prov. If knowing something makes you unhappy, it would be better not to know it. (Also the cliché: ignorance is bliss.) Ellen: The doctor didn't tell Dad that Mom probably won't recover from her illness. Do you think we should tell him? Bill: No. It would only make him unhappy and ruin their last months together. Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise.
See also: folly, ignorance, wise