wheeled


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Related to wheeled: shouldered, wheedled

wheel and deal

To proactively and frequently pursue business deals or other actions of benefit to oneself or one's organization through the building and leveraging of contacts and relationships, especially in a prolific, aggressive, or unscrupulous way. You can't just expect to move up in the workplace without making some contacts. You have to wheel and deal a little. Nothing gets done on Capitol Hill without a lot of people wheeling and dealing. It's just how politics is.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel around

1. To push someone or something around in some wheeled carrier, such as a cart or wheelchair. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "around." My worst job was as a stock picker the warehouse, where I had to wheel around inventory people had ordered online. My wife had to wheel me around in a wheelchair for nearly a year while my arms and legs healed after the accident.
2. To push some kind of wheeled carrier or vehicle to, through, or around a location. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "around." My mom always makes me wheel around the shopping cart while she picks out what we need. The police said we couldn't ride our bikes in the area, so we just had to wheel them around on foot.
3. To rotate or spin very quickly in a circle. The disc at the end of the motor keeps wheeling around, even after I let go of the power button. As the ride continued to wheel around, I could feel myself becoming more and more nauseated.
4. To turn or spin very rapidly in or toward the opposite direction. She wheeled around with an angry look on her face when I said her name. I went to pet the dog when it wheeled around and bit me!
5. To cause someone or something turn or spin very rapidly in or toward the opposite direction. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "around." I wheeled him around so he could see what was being done to his car. Tom wheeled around the shopping cart when he realized he'd forgotten to pick up milk.
See also: around, wheel

wheel in

1. To arrive in(to some place) on a wheeled vehicle. We wheeled in around 2 AM, so there wasn't a single place still open where we could get food. The kids wheeled in on their bicycles just before dinner was ready.
2. To drive or maneuver a wheeled vehicle or apparatus into something or some place. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "in." You can wheel that cart in here when you're not using it. They wheeled in the dolly and left it beside the truck.
3. To transport someone or something into something or some place on a wheeled vehicle or apparatus. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "in." We wheeled in the goods on a dolly. His friends stuck him in a shopping cart and wheeled him in.
See also: wheel

wheel into (something or some place)

1. To arrive into some place on wheels or on a wheeled vehicle or apparatus. We wheeled into the city around 2 AM, so there wasn't a single place still open where we could get food. The ambulance wheeled into the ER with another victim from the accident.
2. To drive or maneuver a wheeled vehicle or apparatus into something or some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "wheel" and "into." You can wheel that cart into the storage closet when you're not using it. We wheeled the car into the rest area so everyone could get out and stretch their legs.
3. To transport someone or something into something or some place on a wheeled vehicle or apparatus. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "wheel" and "into." We wheeled the goods into the warehouse on a dolly. His friends stuck him in a shopping cart and wheeled him into the grocery store.
See also: wheel

wheel off

1. To depart or travel away (from someone or something) on wheels or on a wheeled vehicle or apparatus. The suspicious black car wheeled off just before it reached the military checkpoint. A: "Where are Tom and Martha?" B: "Oh, they wheeled off about an hour ago."
2. To drive or maneuver a wheeled vehicle or apparatus away (from someone, something, or some place). In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "off." The waiter wheeled off the dessert cart before I had a chance to select something. We started wheeling our bicycles off toward the sound of the ice cream truck.
3. To transport someone or something away (from someone, something, or some place) on a wheeled vehicle or apparatus. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "off." The thieves apparently wheeled the antique statue off using a dolly in the middle of the night. His friends stuck him in a shopping cart and wheeled him off from the grocery store as fast as they could.
4. To drive or roll over the edge (of something) or off the surface (of something) on wheels. The driver had forgotten to put the car's emergency brake on, and it wheeled right off the side of the cliff. The stroller wheeled off the sidewalk and into the middle of traffic. Thankfully, someone ran out and got it before there was an accident.
5. To drive or maneuver something over the edge (of something) or off the surface (of something) on wheels. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "off." Please wheel your cart off the lawn—it's damaging the grass. We wheeled the car off the interstate and onto a smaller side road to avoid detection.
See also: off, wheel

wheel out

1. To leave or move out (of some place) on a wheeled vehicle or apparatus. He climbed into the car, put it into reverse, and wheeled out of the parking lot. She turned her wheelchair around and wheeled out before I could apologize.
2. To push someone or something into the room on a wheeled carrier or vehicle of some kind. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wheel" and "out." Doctors wheeled the patient out so she could take questions from the press about the extraordinary surgery. The architect wheeled out her design of the skyscraper she had designed for the city.
3. To push someone or something out of some place on a wheeled carrier or vehicle of some kind. A noun or pronoun is used between "wheel" and "out." I found it hard to navigate my wheelchair through so many people, so I had Jeff help wheel me out of the party. The demonstrators wheeled the prototype out of the conference room after the presentation concluded.
See also: out, wheel

wheel out of (something or some place)

1. To move out of some place on a wheeled vehicle or apparatus. He climbed into the car, put it into reverse, and wheeled out of the parking lot. She turned her wheelchair around and wheeled out of the room.
2. To push or maneuver someone or something out of some place on a wheeled vehicle or apparatus. A noun or pronoun is used between "wheel" and "out." I found it hard to navigate my wheelchair through so many people, so I had Jeff help wheel me out of the party. The demonstrators wheeled the prototype out of the conference room after the presentation had concluded.
See also: of, out, wheel

wheel and deal

to take part in clever (but sometimes dishonest or immoral) business deals. John loves to wheel and deal in the money markets. Jack got tired of all the wheeling and dealing of big business and retired to run a pub in the country.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel around

to turn around quickly; to change direction quickly. She wheeled around quickly to face him. Suddenly, Roger wheeled around and started chasing Wally.
See also: around, wheel

wheel someone or something around

to push or steer around someone or something on wheels. I had to wheel my great-uncle around all day when we visited the zoo. I wheeled around my uncle so he could enjoy the park. I wheeled the heavy shopping cart around the grocery store.
See also: around, wheel

wheel someone or something off

to push or steer someone or something on wheels some distance away. The nurse wheeled the old man off. Karen wheeled off the patient.
See also: off, wheel

wheel and deal

Operate or manipulate for one's own interest, especially in an aggressive or unscrupulous way. For example, Bernie's wheeling and dealing has made him rich but not very popular. This term comes from gambling in the American West, where a wheeler-dealer was a heavy bettor on the roulette wheel and at cards. [Colloquial; c. 1940]
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

If someone wheels and deals, they use a lot of different methods and contacts to achieve what they want in business or politics. He still wheels and deals around the globe. Note: This kind of activity can be called wheeling and dealing. He hates the wheeling and dealing associated with political life. Note: This expression is often used to show that you think someone is behaving dishonestly.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

engage in commercial or political scheming.
The verb wheel is here used to mean ‘control events’. The sense is related to the noun a big wheel , meaning ‘an important person who makes things happen’.
See also: and, deal, wheel

ˌwheel and ˈdeal

(disapproving) do a lot of complicated deals in business or politics, often in a dishonest way: He’s spent the last three years wheeling and dealing in the City.I don’t want to go into politics — there’s too much wheeling and dealing. ▶ ˌwheeler-ˈdealer noun
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel around

v.
1. To turn around or as if around a central axis; rotate or revolve: The merry-go-round wheeled around.
2. To turn rapidly to face the opposite direction: I wheeled around to face the attacker.
3. To cause something to turn rapidly to face the opposite direction: The principal grabbed my shoulder and wheeled me around.
See also: around, wheel

wheel out

v.
To present someone or something, by or as if by wheeling them into view: The coach wheeled the star quarterback out for an interview. The company wheeled out charts supporting its claims.
See also: out, wheel

wheel and deal

in. to negotiate, cajole, and connive—aggressively. (see also wheeler-dealer.) If you can’t wheel and deal, you can’t run for elective office.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

Informal
To engage in the advancement of one's own interests, especially in a canny, aggressive, or unscrupulous way.
See also: and, deal, wheel
References in periodicals archive ?
One way of improving the drawback of walking robots may be to develop hybrid, in order to exploit merits of both walking and wheeled systems.
in the front and two passive wheels as feet and two actuated rear wheels, the robot proposed by the authors can move using three locomotion modes: wheeled mode and two hybrid locomotion modes.
While most wheeled material handlers have four-wheel drive and are capable of operating when the ground is soft and wet, that environment is usually left to crawlers, says Paul Hill, products manager at Liebherr America Inc., Newport News, Va.
"Wheeled material handlers are better suited to work on smooth, paved surfaces that will provide a stable base from which to operate the machine.
Another factor driving the popularity of wheeled handlers is simply general improvement in the equipment, according to Marceglia.
They may not be able to climb mountains of scrap, but wheeled material handlers offer many advantages to scrap processors, Marceglia says.
However, as the industry evolves, an increasing number of scrap processors want to get more out of each machine rather than buying and maintaining a machine for each specialized job on a yard, which is where wheeled machines also come in handy, LeBlanc says.
Wheeled machines offer moderate travel speeds of about 10 to 12 mph--about three or four times faster than a tracked model.
Another attractive feature to some scrap processors is the cab on a wheeled machine, which tends to be higher, even at its minimum height, than the cab on a tracked machine, says Marceglia.