wheedle out of

wheedle out of

1. To cajole, flatter, beg, or beguile someone in order to obtain or steal something from them. A noun or pronoun is used between "wheedle" and "out." He's just a piece of lowly scum who spends his time wheedling pensioners out of their savings over the phone. I can't believe I let Seth wheedle me out of my favorite pencil case!
2. To obtain or steal something from someone through cajolery, flattery, pleading, or beguilement. A noun or pronoun is used between "wheedle" and "out." I hate these pushy charity workers, trying to wheedle every last cent out of you that they can. After begging and pleading, the kids finally wheedled the car out of me for the weekend.
See also: of, out, wheedle

wheedle out of

v.
1. To obtain something from some person through the use of flattery or guile: The swindler wheedled my life savings out of me.
2. To defraud someone of something through the use of flattery or guile: The swindler wheedled me out of my life savings.
See also: of, out, wheedle
References in periodicals archive ?
The photograph was taken when we visited Spokane, Washington State, a permission which I had to wheedle out of my commanding officer as we were not normally allowed to travel out of Canada.
Good on Threshers for honouring the vouchers when many a miserly company would have tried to wheedle out of it.
Is this association really trying to create a situation in which motorists who are legitimately caught breaking the law -it says it does not condone lawbreaking -can wheedle out of their offence simply by pretending they weren't the driver?
But most people will see it as another way to wheedle out of paying up.
We would have had more chance of truth coming out of Josef Stalin's Kremlin than we will ever wheedle out of the Labour Government on this issue.