what's not to like?

what's not to like?

The subject being spoken of is without fault. The phrase dates from the second half of the 1900s and was extremely well known by the 1970s. In a cartoon strip “Juliet Jones” in the Lowell Sun of August 1974, a woman describes a man, saying, “He’s brave, handsome, industrious, an enemy of criminals. . . . what’s not to like about such a man?” Occasionally the expression is used ironically, applied to something the speaker considers quite unlikeable. Thus a Newsweek article opposing health-care reform was headlined “What’s Not to Like? Reform? Why Do We Need Health-Care Reform? Everything Is Just Fine the Way It Is” (July 31, 2009).
See also: not