What's in a name?

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What's in a name?

What someone or something is called or labeled is arbitrary compared to their or its intrinsic qualities. A reference to Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, in which Juliet bemoan's Romeo's last name of Montague, her family's sworn enemies. I know my it isn't a brand-name, top-of-the-line computer, but it does everything I need it to—what's in a name, after all? Our company values experience and proven ability over the various degrees and titles that appear on your résumé. What's in a name, that's our opinion.

What's in a name?

Prov. The name of a thing does not matter as much as the quality of the thing. (From Shakespeare's play, Romeo and Juliet.) Sue: I want to buy this pair of jeans. Mother: This other pair is much cheaper. Sue: But it doesn't have the designer brand name. Mother: What's in a name?

what's in a name?

names are arbitrary labels.
This phrase comes from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: ‘What's in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet’.