whack


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full whack

1. adverb At the highest, fullest, or maximum capacity or effect. Our servers have been running full whack ever since we released our online multiplayer game.
2. noun The highest, fullest, or maximum amount, capacity, or effect. They had turned the stove on to full whack without telling us, and we ended up burning our roast. John always pays the full whack for the newest technology.
See also: full, whack

have a whack (at something)

To have a chance to try (doing something); to attempt to do or undertake (something). I can't get the lid off this jar for the life of me. Do you want to have a whack? I'm going to have a whack at doing my own taxes this year, to save on the cost of hiring an accountant. Let me have a whack at getting the car started.
See also: have, whack

whack-a-mole

1. Literally, an arcade game in which the player uses a small rubber mallet to hit robotic toy moles that pop up randomly in holes laid out across the surface of the machine. I love coming to this old arcade. I have a lot of fond memories playing whack-a-mole and skee ball here as a kid.
2. By extension, a situation in which problems continue to arise faster than one is able to solve or cope with them, resulting in piecemeal, incomplete, or temporary results. These dang pop-up ads are so annoying! It's a game of whack-a-mole every time I go online these days! Every time we think we have the software debugged, more problems show up. We've just been playing whack-a-mole from day one!

beat off

1. To send away; to force to retreat. Despite the connotation of "beat," this phrase is often used hyperbolically and does not have to reference violent action. Because their house is in such a great location, they have been beating off a lot of interested buyers. I somehow managed to beat off the intruder with a baseball bat. Your daughter is so pretty—it's only a matter of time until she's beating off the suitors!
2. vulgar slang To masturbate. Typically said of males. A: "Why is he all embarrassed today?" B: "Oh, his crush walked in on him beating off. How horrifying is that?"
See also: beat, off

out of kilter

1. Out of equilibrium; not straight, level, or aligned properly. This wall is a little out of kilter. We'll need to account for that during the renovation.
2. In a state of confusion or chaos. The economy has remained out of kilter in many countries across Europe, even as the global economy has started to recover. It seems like everything in my life has gone out of kilter recently.
3. Not working correctly or properly; out of order; out of w(h)ack. It sounds like your car's engine is a bit out of kilter. I'd recommend taking it to a mechanic before you go for any long drives.
See also: kilter, of, out

take a whack at (someone or something)

1. To hit or attempt to hit someone or something with one's fist or some kind of instrument. I took a whack at him for making such a lewd suggestion. Try taking a whack at it—that usually gets the motor running again.
2. To attempt (to do) something; to take a turn trying (to do) something. Well, I haven't fixed a motor in nearly 10 years, but I'll certainly take a whack at it. You had your chance trying to break the piñata, now let your sister take a whack at it.
See also: take, whack

top whack

1. An extremely high or the highest possible amount of money. The manager is understandably upset to have paid top whack for the best player in the league, only to have him out with a career-ending injury after the first game. It's clear the only area has the super rich in mind in terms of housing; for those not earning top whack, affordable accommodation will be a good ways out of town.
2. The highest possible speed a vehicle, especially a car, can reach. The manager is understandably upset to have paid top whack for the best player in the league, only to have him out with a career-ending injury after the first game. It's clear the only area has the super rich in mind in terms of housing; for those not earning top whack, affordable accommodation will be a good ways out of town.
See also: top, whack

out of whack

1. Not or no longer working or functioning properly. I don't know what's wrong with it, but the computer is totally out of whack—I can't even get past the login screen. The mechanic thinks the carburetor might have been thrown out of whack in the collision.
2. In a disordered or chaotic state. My whole day has been thrown out of whack by this accident. Our production timeline is a little out of whack because of the server crash we've been dealing with.
3. Not or no longer feeling good or normal; depressed or melancholy. Sorry, I've been a bit out of whack lately. I think I just need a bit of time to myself. I think you've been cooped up inside for too long. It's important to get some sunshine and fresh air each day, or else you start feeling out of whack.
See also: of, out, whack

whack off

1. To complete something very quickly and without much effort. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whack" and "off." It used to take me quite a while to write articles for this website, but I've gotten to the point where I can whack them off in under an hour. I just need to whack off a couple emails before I head home.
2. To cut something off or away, especially quickly, indelicately, or without finesse. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whack" and "off." I had been growing my hair out since I was in junior high school, and then one day I decided to whack it all off. The knight whacked off the peasant's arm for his insubordination. Will you go out back and whack those branches off the tree? They're obstructing our view of the sea.
3. vulgar slang To masturbate, especially a man.
4. vulgar slang To bring someone else to orgasm with one's hand or hands, especially a male. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "whack" and "off."
See also: off, whack

beat someone or something off

to drive someone or something away by beating. They beat the enemy off. The army beat off the savage attack, saving the town. I was able to beat off the intruder.
See also: beat, off

*out of kilter

 and *off-kilter 
1. Lit. out of balance; crooked or tilted. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; knock something ~.) John, your tie is sort of off-kilter. Let me fix it. Please straighten the picture on the wall. It's out of kilter.
2. Fig. malfunctioning; on the fritz. (*Typically: be ~; go ~.) My furnace is out of kilter. I have to call someone to fix it. This computer is out of kilter. It doesn't let me log on.
See also: kilter, of, out

*try at someone

 and *shot at someone; *crack at someone; *go at someone *stab at someone
an attempt to convince someone of something; an attempt to try to get information out of someone; an attempt to try to train someone to do something. (The expressions with shot and crack are more informal than the main entry phrase. (*Typically: take ~; have ~; give someone ~.) Let me have a crack at him. I can make him talk. Let the new teacher have a try at Billy. She can do marvels with unwilling learners. Give me a crack at him. I know how to make these bums talk.
See also: try

*try at something

 and *shot at something; *crack at something; *go at something; *stab at something; *whack at something
to take a turn at trying to do something. (*Typically: take ~; have ~; give someone ~.) All of us wanted to have a try at the prize-winning shot. Let Sally have a shot at it. If you let me have a crack at it, maybe I can be successful.
See also: try

whack someone or something up

Sl. to damage someone or something. Bob got mad at Greg and whacked him up. Clara whacked up her car yesterday.
See also: up, whack

whack something off

 
1. Sl. to complete something easily or quickly. If you want a pair of these, I can whack them off for you in a few minutes. The artisan whacked off a set of the earrings in a few minutes.
2. Sl. to cut or chop something off. A tree branch is rubbing against the house. I guess I'll go out and whack that branch off. Whack off that other branch while you are at it.
See also: off, whack

whack something

up Sl. to chop something up. In about an hour, he had whacked the tree up into small logs. Have you whacked up the chicken for frying yet?

whacked (out)

Sl. intoxicated. Gee, is he ever whacked! Dave was so whacked out he couldn't stand up.

beat off

Repulse, drive away by blows, as in We tried to beat off the flying ants swarming about us. Originating in the mid-1600s in a military context, this term was being used for other activities by the mid-1700s.
See also: beat, off

have a crack at

Also, get or have a go or shot or whack at ; take a crack at. Make an attempt or have a turn at doing something. For example, Let me have a crack at assembling it, or I had a shot at it but failed, or Dad thinks he can-let him have a go at it, or Dave had a whack at changing the tire, or Jane wants to take a crack at it. The oldest of these colloquialisms is have a shot at, alluding to firing a gun and first recorded in 1756; crack and go date from the 1830s, and whack from the late 1800s.
See also: crack, have

out of kilter

Also, out of whack. Not properly adjusted, not working well, out of order. For example, This whole schedule is out of kilter with the rest of our projects, or The wheels on the trailer are out of whack. The first term, also spelled kelter, dates from the early 1600s and its origin is not known. The precise allusion of the variant, a colloquial term dating from the late 1800s, is also unclear. Possibly it relates to a whack, or blow, throwing something off, or some suggest, to wacky, that is, "crazy."
See also: kilter, of, out

out of whack

see under out of kilter.
See also: of, out, whack

whack off

1. Cut off, as in The cook whacked off the fish's head with one blow, or The barber whacked off more hair than I wanted him to. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
2. Masturbate, as in He went to his room and whacked off. [ Vulgar slang; mid-1900s]
See also: off, whack

have a crack at

make an attempt at doing, achieving, or winning (something).
See also: crack, have

out of kilter

out of harmony or balance.
Kilter , dating from the early 17th century, was a dialect word meaning ‘frame or order’. It is now used only in this phrase.
See also: kilter, of, out

out of whack

out of order; not working. North American & Australian
1998 Bookseller There's been a fair amount of jeering…at the Sunday Times for getting its figures so comprehensively out of whack, by a factor of about 100 if memory serves.
See also: of, out, whack

top (or full) whack

the maximum price or rate.
1989 Holiday Which? Tour prices vary; you pay top whack if you book in large hotels.
See also: top, whack

out of ˈkilter

out of harmony or balance; not working properly: Long-haul flights tend to throw your body clock out of kilter for a couple of days.
See also: kilter, of, out

out of ˈwhack

(informal, especially American English)
1 not appropriate or correct, especially in relation to something else: The Olympics have made flights and accommodation here incredibly expensive. Prices are way out of whack with normal.If you ask me, his priorities are all out of whack. He should find a job first, then decide where to live.
2 (especially of a system or machine) not working as it should: Don’t bother trying to call me on my cellphone. It’s out of whack again.
See also: of, out, whack

beat off

v.
1. To drive someone or something away, especially by fighting or hitting: Two robbers attacked me on the subway, but I beat them off with my bag. After a long battle, the soldiers beat off the invaders.
2. To defeat someone or something in a competition: Our company intends to beat off our rivals for the contract. The visiting team was behind us for most of the game, but beat us off squarely in the end.
3. Vulgar Slang To masturbate. Used of males.
See also: beat, off

whack off

v. Vulgar Slang
To masturbate. Used of males.
See also: off, whack

beat off

and ball off and jack off and jag off and jerk off and pull oneself off and toss off and wack off and wank off and whack off and whank off and whip off
1. in. to masturbate. (Usually objectionable.) They say if you beat off too much, you’ll get pimples.
2. in. to waste time; to waste one’s efforts; to do something inefficiently. The whole lot of them were jacking off rather than sticking to business. Stop whanking off and get on with your work!
See also: beat, off

whack off

verb
See also: off, whack

out of kilter

1. mod. not functioning properly; on the fritz; out of w(h)ack. My car’s engine is out of kilter and needs some repair work.
2. mod. out of square. That corner is not square, and the wall even looks out of kilter.
See also: kilter, of, out

out of w(h)ack

mod. out of adjustment; inoperative. (see also out of kilter.) I think my left eye is out of wack a little. Maybe I need glasses.
See also: of, out, whack

take a whack at someone/something

tv. to hit at someone or something. Jerry got an ax and took a whack at the tree but didn’t do much damage.

take a whack at something

tv. to have a try at something. Why don’t you practice a little while and take a whack at it tomorrow?
See also: something, take, whack

whack

and wack
1. tv. to strike someone or something. Larry reached down and wacked the dog across the snout.
2. n. a blow or hit (at someone or something). She landed a nasty wack on his thigh.
3. n. a drink of liquor. Take a whack of this stuff.
4. Go to w(h)acked.

w(h)ack someone/something up

in. to damage someone or something. (see also whack something up.) Bob got mad at Greg and whacked him up.
See also: someone, something, up, whack

w(h)ack someone (out)

tv. to kill somebody. (Underworld.) Willie made another try at whacking Albert out last evening.
See also: out, someone, whack

whack someone

verb
See also: someone, whack

whack something off

1. tv. to complete something easily or quickly. If you want a pair of these, I can whack them off for you in a few minutes.
2. tv. to cut or chop something off. A tree branch is rubbing against the house. I guess I’ll go out and whack that branch off.
See also: off, something, whack

w(h)ack something (out)

tv. to rob a place; to swindle a business establishment. (Underworld.) Did your guys wack the church collection box?
See also: out, something, whack

whack something

verb
See also: something, whack

whack something up

tv. to chop something up. In about an hour, he had whacked the tree up into small logs.
See also: something, up, whack

w(h)acked

and w(h)ack
1. mod. wild; silly. Bill was wacked as always and embarrassed us all.
2. Go to w(h)acked (out).

whack

verb

whacked

verb

out of whack

Informal
Improperly ordered or balanced; not functioning correctly.
See also: of, out, whack

out of kilter/whack

Out of adjustment or alignment, not working properly. Kilter is an American variant of kelter, an English dialect word used since the seventeenth century to mean “in good condition.” James Lowell used it in an 1862 letter, “I must rest awhile. My brain is out of kilter.” The origin of the synonymous out of whack, dating from the late 1800s, is more mysterious. The OED suggests it may come from wacky, for “crazy,” but that is by no means certain. Both terms are used to describe malfunctioning mechanisms (“This tape recorder is out of kilter and won’t rewind”) as well as figuratively (“He may have a conscience, but if you ask me, it’s slightly out of whack”).
See also: kilter, of, out, whack
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, even for someone overflowing with ideas, following up a debut as iconic as Whack World can't be easy.
They "work" when one whacks them against a table, chair, the floor, one's thigh and so on.
When the electrical part of the heart goes out of whack and causes the ventricles to quiver this condition is known as:
More than just a coming-of-age story, Rita Coburn Whack's Meant to Be also explores Christianity, ancestral spirits and divine guidance, and how they will lead one toward a fulfilling life.
The site's "Whack of the Week" features corporate and government gobblegook as evidenced in their press releases.
Women hover on pointe, whack their legs from arabesque to six o'clock high in front, pitch into large, swooping leg circles, then fly into a frenzy of angular gestural semaphore.
I may have to whack it to crack it -- 10 times or more.
Oh, well, Happy Birthday, anyway." He gave Fred his birthday whacks. One whack for each year he was old, plus one to "grow on."
According to author Stewart Holbrook, Douglas-fir logging began with one Clement Adams Bradbury, a native of Saco, Maine, who on January 15, 1847, spat on his hands, grabbed his double-bitted ax, and took his first whack at the biggest tree he had ever seen, a fir eight feet in diameter near Astoria, Oregon.
'Whack us (new government) on our failure to do our work.
But you could never justify paying the Stones their whack, then paying even more again to line the pockets of the parasitic touts who are blighting live music in the UK.
I picked up a baseball bat that we have and chased him out, I was going to give him a good whack. I also thought about getting a photograph of him but he ran off."
Mrs Arkwright added: "This guy literally smirked, as if, excuse my French, basically 'f*** you' and then whack.
I support all sports I'll put ANY jersey from ANY pro team if I'm whack for wearing jerseys they give me out of love then I'm Whack
But we just came to the point where he got a whack in the game before Wolves and he got a whack in training Monday.