wetware


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wetware

(ˈwɛtwɛr)
n. the human brain. (Compared to computer hardware and software.) This isn’t a hardware problem; it’s a wetware problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
globalized controlling networks, which The Diamond Age refreshes by pushing these wetware webs into the domain of socialist and cognitive fields.
A similarly slapstick moment occurs in the 1988 sequel, Wetware, when Detective Stahn Mooney (a.k.a.
At Galapagos Wetware, clones are created for this purpose with the exception of two special ones, Kay and Jack, who have been specially engineered for a new project.
(1.) Judy Harris, "Wetware: Why Use Activity Structures?" Learning and Leading With Technology 25, no.
Term used among crackers and samurai (hackers who hire out for legal cracking jobs) for cracking techniques that rely on weaknesses in wetware (human beings attached to a computer) rather than software; the aim is to trick people into revealing passwords or other information that compromises a target system's security.
One thing for sure is you can bet these "wetware," or biological systems, won't be available in your local Best Buy or Circuit City anytime soon--if ever.
Este tipo de costes son muy amplios y pueden ir desde el gasto asociado al cambio de una tecnologia hasta el gasto de aprendizaje de nuevos conocimientos (wetware).
This artefact/environment, consisting of hardware, software and what Lovink (1995) refers to as "wetware," exists on a server, on people's hard drives as an archive but, most importantly, within the collective consciousness of the people--the "wetware." The cognition may be centrally stored by hardware, but it is distributed between the users' hardware and the users' consciousness.
Strauss: We talk about -- and I imagine this might be old news -- the 70-20-10 equation that the cost of computers, of technology, is 70 percent wetware, meaning people; whether it's client decision-making, planning, shopping or talking to vendors, training, support, implementation, 20 percent is hardware and 10 percent software.
Investments in hardware and software are always only as good as your investment in wetware (people).
Describing most large wargames as "model-aided" is therefore more accurate than terming them "computer-driven." And if major innovations are to occur from wargames or, at least, insights reached as to how new operational concepts might be implemented, they will emerge through the "wetware" developing the "wash-up" (i.e.
Increasingly, neurobiology began to play a leading role in this partnership as researchers turned from an exclusive focus on the mind as a computer program to the exploration of how this program is actually implemented in the brain's "wetware."
To function productively in such a context, a recombinant, post-human, biologically hybrid, electronic, "Hypertext" body merging hardware, software, and wetware must displace the fully fleshed body; the (now) recumbent physical body is reenergized by "no-subjectivity," an "Alt.Subjectivity," in which the body and self disappear into relational networks, recombinant subject positionalities (nomadic, multiple, positionless positionalities) (200 0b, esp.
For instance, it defies the assumption tacitly still held by many researchers in cognitive science and artificial intelligence that man is essentially an automaton, a sophisticated computer and that the human mind is nothing but a complex software (of a "wetware", as some describe it, to highlight its physiological moorings).
In "Michel Foucault, Consciousness, and the Being of Language," Karlis Racevskis identifies the problem, not as the "explanatory gap"--"a generally acknowledged, persisting inability to explain the connection between the physical and the mental, between the material 'wetware' of our brains and the immaterial realm of thought"--but as the approach to that gap.