wet (one's) whistle

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wet (one's) whistle

To have something to drink. I'm parched. I'm going to need to wet my whistle before we go on. If you're looking for Barney, he's down at the pub wetting his whistle.
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wet one's whistle

Rur. to take a drink. He stopped at the bar to wet his whistle. I don't need a big glass of water. Just enough to wet my whistle.
See also: wet, whistle
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wet one's whistle

Have a drink, as in I'm just going to wet my whistle before I go out on the tennis court. This expression uses whistle in the sense of "mouth" and may allude to the fact that it is very hard to whistle with dry lips. [Late 1300s]
See also: wet, whistle
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wet your whistle

OLD-FASHIONED, INFORMAL
If you wet your whistle, you have a drink, especially an alcoholic drink. There's a mouth-watering menu and an excellent selection of beers to wet your whistle. Note: `Whistle' is an old slang word for mouth or throat.
See also: wet, whistle
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

wet your whistle

have a drink. informal
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wet your ˈwhistle

(old-fashioned, informal) have an alcoholic drink
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wet (one's) whistle

Informal
To take a drink.
See also: wet, whistle
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wet one's whistle, to

To have a drink. It is very difficult to whistle with dry lips. An old children’s party game involves eating some dry crackers or bread and attempting to whistle; the first to succeed in doing so wins a prize. The term has been around since the fourteenth century. It appeared in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales: “So was her joly whistle wel y-wet” (The Reeve’s Tale).
See also: to, wet
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
After watching the process of grain, water and yeast being combined to produce single malt and blended varieties, we were given the chance to wet our whistle, putting them to the test under the guidance of resident expert, Eve.
To escape those we decided to wet our whistle at a bar, then found an interesting little flea market near the stop for the shuttle bus back to the ship.
So when we were done ripping the streets for the day, we'd retire to the Floridita and wet our whistle, somewhere you could rest your bones and partake in some local rum and cigars, and every night hear a live rendition of "Hotel California" and generally trip out on the whole scene.
To escape those we decided to wet our whistle at a bar then found an interesting little flea market near the stop for the shuttle bus back to the ship.
We selected a bottle of rather expensive -- at pounds 17 a shout -- red Zinfandel from the Parducci stable to wet our whistles. However, having yet again drawn the driver's short straw, I had to contend myself with sedately sipping a single glass while she was more into swigging.